Halfway Lake

Birding

Bald Eagles, osprey, many species of woodpecker and a variety of northern songbirds, like the Yellow Warbler, are common sightings in the park.

Boating

Halfway Lake is ideal for smaller watercraft and offers a boat launch. All other lakes in the park have motor restrictions.

Canoeing

Two Narrows Canoe Route
The Two Narrows Canoe Route begins on Halfway Lake and travels south into Bailey Lake. It is here that you can see nesting Bald Eagles, a Great Blue Heron rookery and the origins of the 2007 forest fire. From there a series of portages and small lakes takes you deep into the heart of the park. The landforms and vegetation in the Two Narrows Lake area is the central natural heritage feature of the park. Ground moraines created by glaciers thousands of years ago lie on top of rolling bedrock cloaked in forests dominated by jack pine, white birch and poplar. The canoeist can then travel back from Trapper Lake along the original route or through Benny Lake. This canoe route can be competed in one day but there are interior campsites for those who wish to spend more time enjoying the solitude. Dawn and dusk offer excellent wildlife viewing opportunities.

Antrim Lake Canoe Route
Located at the northern edge of the park, Antrim Lake is accessed on the east side of highway 144. This day trip offers spectacular scenery including tall cliffs and ample wildlife viewing opportunities. There are a number of secluded sandy beaches that offer quiet picnicking and swimming opportunities.

Fishing

Halfway Lake provides anglers some excellent fishing opportunities for Small-mouth Bass, Northern Pike, Walleye and Lake Trout.

Hiking

Moose Ridge Trail - Rating: Moderate - Length: 2 km, 0.5-1 hour
This trail winds along Raven Lake and up and over a small glacial ridge. This is an excellent trail for families and offers exceptional scenic vistas. 

Echo Pond Trail - Rating: Moderate - Length: 6 km, 1.5 hours
This trail extends from Moose Ridge and continues along Raven Lake and over part of a steeper ridge system. The trail then wanders north along the west shore of Echo Pond where grassy wetlands provide an ideal place for sighting wildlife. Beaver, mink and the majestic moose are regular visitors to this area. Echo Pond Trail connects to the much longer Hawk Ridge Trail. Be sure to watch the trail signsso that you are not hiking onto the longer trail!

Hawk Ridge Trail - Rating: Difficult - Length: 15 km, 6-8 hours
This is the longest and most difficult hiking trail in the park.  Hawk Ridge extends off the northern portion of Echo Pond Trail and travels deep into the heart of the interior. The trail passes through part of the forest devastated by the 2002 tornado when mature trees were instantaneously flattened. The trail visits several lakes including tiny Lost Lake with several low cliffs that provide great vantage points. One of the highlights of the trail is the lookout over Three Island Lake. It alone is worth the trip. There are a few interior campsites located along the last stretch of the trail that the weary hiker can rest for the night. * Interior camping fees apply.

Osprey Heights Trail - Rating: Moderate to Difficult - Length: 6 km, 2 hours
Located on the east side of Highway 144, towards the north end of the park, this trail starts across a short section of low wetland forest before climbing sharply up into the rugged rocky hills of the Canadian Shield. The trail meanders east through mossy clearings, forests and along cliff tops to the edge of Antrim Lake. The Osprey Heights Lookout provides a superb view from over 50 metres above Antrim Lake. This is a great photo opportunity and an ideal place to stop for lunch. The trail then loops back west.

Hunting

Hunting is permitted only in the park addition. For more information contact 705-966-2315 ext 701

Natural Heritage Education

Have you ever wondered how many times a Pileated Woodpecker drums at a tree in just one second? If you have ever contemplated the mysterious world of owls and why the northern night sky dances in the summer then you will want to attend the excellent Natural Heritage Education programs. Park Naturalists offer a complete range of interpretive activities for the entire family. They include guided trail hikes, canoe hikes, campfires, children’s programs and special events. Be sure to visit the Visitor Centre where you can get a firsthand glimpse of the wildlife that call Halfway Lake home. It is here that staff can assist with species identification, provide some history on the park or walk with you while you stroll through the centre looking at the various exhibits.

Swimming

Halfway Lake has excellent swimming in its day-use area and is close to the campground. The large buoyed swimming area and long sandy beach with shallow entry is perfect for children.