Discovery and trails go together like peanut butter and jelly

In our “Behind the Scenes” series, Discovery Program staff across the province share a “backstage” glimpse of their favourite programs and projects. Today’s post comes from David Bree, Discovery Program Lead at Presqu’ile Provincial Park.

Trails and parks go together like (fill in your favourite pairing here: “like peas and carrots,” as Forrest Gump would say). Trails are arguably the most used recreational facility in our park system.

But trails don’t just happen; first a concept must be born.

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Back to school at Pinery

Today’s blog comes from Nicole Benn and Annalise Twomey, senior park interpreters at Pinery Provincial Park.

Cicadas are singing, Monarchs are migrating, and students and teachers are preparing!

Back to school season is upon us, but returning to class does not mean exploring Ontario Parks is over. We can still build memories in our parks by learning with students of all ages at Pinery Provincial Park.

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Quetico’s wilderness voices

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, an information specialist at Quetico Provincial Park.

Quetico’s oral histories have been locked away on archival cassettes at the John B. Ridley Research Library — until now.

Courtesy of history enthusiasts from the University of Wisconsin Whitewater, they have come out of the vault and into our ears.

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Bon Echo’s Wanderer Tour

Today’s “Behind the scenes” blog comes from Caitie Carney,  a member of Bon Echo’s Discovery Program team.

If you asked visitors at Bon Echo Provincial Park “What keeps you coming back?”, the answer you’d probably hear is “Mazinaw Rock.”

Standing 92 m (300 feet) above Mazinaw Lake, Mazinaw Rock is a spectacle that commands the attention of visitors both on land and on water.

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From schooling to teaching at Rondeau

Today’s post comes from Kevin Gevaert, a Discovery Guide at Rondeau Provincial Park.

I am a student Discovery Guide here at Rondeau Provincial Park. This will be my fourth year as an interpreter in the Discovery Program.

Let me tell you about my journey in parks.

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Trailblazers of Ontario Parks interpretation

Last year marked Ontario Parks’ 125th anniversary: 125 years of campfires, hikes, nights under the stars, days at the beach, and unforgettable family memories of the countless visitors who use our beautiful park system.

This year marks two other important anniversaries – Rondeau Provincial Park’s 125th anniversary and 75 years of interpretation in Ontario Parks!

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Award-winning interpreter in our midst at Murphys Point

With another busy summer season of programs about to begin at parks across the province, we wanted to profile one of our award-winning staff members.

Earlier this spring, Mark Read, Senior Naturalist at Murphys Point Provincial Park, won the Sandy McBeath Outstanding Seasonal Interpreter Award. This honour is awarded to one interpreter annually in the Great Lakes Region by the National Association for Interpretation.

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Interpreting Ontario: introducing Ontario Parks’ interpreters

Today’s post comes from Cathy Entwhistle, the Natural Heritage Education Leader and Volunteer Coordinator at Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

Reading the title, you might think this blog is about the many languages featured in Ontario.

While Ontario Parks is visited by dozens of different language speakers each year and we do our best to communicate with everyone, the staff we call “interpreters” might only speak one language (or at least, one human language).

In Ontario Parks, an interpreter’s job is actually to interpret Ontario’s nature and history for our many park visitors.

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