By paddle and boot: citizen science in the backcountry       

This post was written by David LeGros, park naturalist at Algonquin Provincial Park.

Are you an explorer? Heading out into parks on a journey of discovery, anxious to see what is on the next lake, around the bend on the portage, or even what might turn up at your campsite?

Me too. I love exploring the backcountry on canoe trips, and I love getting to know Algonquin a little bit better every time. I am also an avid naturalist, so I like to identify the things I see when I’m out there (and no, I don’t know all the species).

Lately, I have become obsessed with iNaturalist (ask my wife). So when we were planning our last canoe trip, I gently guided the route to be in a place where few nature nerds have made records before. For the glory, but also for real/good reasons too.

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Fushimi Lake backcountry

Set in the lush boreal forest with wide-open skies, there’s a definite “northern feel” to Fushimi Lake Provincial Park.

During the day, Fushimi Lake’s horizons look like prairie skies because they seem so wide. At night, the stars are so bright and so numerous that you feel like you’re in a snow globe.

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Tips for backcountry camping with young children

This post comes from Laurel Finney, a Learning and Education Specialist with Ontario Parks.

They say everything changes when you have a baby.

Although that is mostly true, there are some things which do not. For me, one of these is my passion for canoeing and wild places.

My partner and I are avid backcountry campers, and when our babe came along, it was only natural for us to adapt our trips to accommodate our growing family.

The following is a list of tips and tricks meant for experienced campers interested in exploring the backcountry with their little ones.

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Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, Information Specialist at Quetico Provincial Park

Summertime means puppy playtime!

Dogs love the opportunity to be outside as much as you do. A little planning means every family member is happy and safe in the backcountry.

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Woodland Caribou Provincial Park: current conditions

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park‘s network of waterways carve the ancient and weathered Canadian Shield, providing endless route possibilities. The park’s informal motto is: “Where nature still rules.”

Visiting us soon? This is your one-stop-shop for up-to-date info — water levels to backroad conditions — about the park. The intent of this space is to provide visitors of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park with one location where everyone can access the most up-to-date information for all things wilderness, backcountry and planning!

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Backcountry vegetarian cooking

Today’s post comes from Brittany Thatcher and Jill Legault of Quetico Provincial Park.

Going meatless on hiking excursions, canoe trips, or any outdoor adventures can be easy, nutritious, and delicious!

Vegetables and vegetable-based products can provide you with the energy and protein needed to lead successful trips.

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5 backcountry gems of southeastern Ontario

Ontario’s wilderness is a lot closer than you think.

Did you know you can leave downtown Toronto and be paddling out to your campsite in less than 3 hours?

These five southeastern parks are perfect for finding backcountry solitude close to home:

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The Maukinak Trail: paddling from Dryden to Quetico

Today’s post comes from Lise Sorensen, Quetico’s Atikokan Entry Station Gate Attendant and off-season Trails Officer with the Path of the Paddle. If you’re planning to paddle the Maukinak Trail, this info will be indispensable.

Follow the path. It will lead you through boreal rivers and crystal-clear lakes, and past silent, watchful cliffs. Your guides will be eagles and your destination endless.

An integral segment of The Great Trail (Trans Canada Trail), the Path of the Paddle is a ribbon of water that stretches from Thunder Bay to the Manitoba border.

The Maukinak segment of the Path of the Paddle transects vast tracts of uninhabited crown land and connects the small communities of Atikokan and Dryden.

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