Has spring sprung? Depends where you are!

Watching winter slip away is a magical thing. Snow is melting, temperatures are warming, and some of our fair-weather bird friends are returning.

However, Ontario is a huge province, and the arrival of spring looks very different depending on where you are.

Spring comes slowly in many provincial parks.

Every year people are surprised to learn that while urban areas may be in bloom, many provincial parks, such as Algonquin, are still covered in snow and ice.

This can lead to some unwelcome surprises and unsafe situations for visitors who are expecting warm weather and spring-like conditions.

Continue reading Has spring sprung? Depends where you are!

10 ways to enjoy winter at Quetico

Today’s post comes from Quetico Superintendent Trevor Gibb.

Quetico Provincial Park is primarily known for its world class backcountry canoeing opportunities.

However, once the lakes freeze and snow blankets the forest, the park transforms into a wilderness winter wonderland.

Continue reading 10 ways to enjoy winter at Quetico

Master Chef: Ontario Parks backcountry edition

Today’s post comes from Will Oades, Discovery Program Educator
at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Eating in the backcountry should be no different than eating at home!

Well-planned and prepared backcountry meals can taste amazing, satisfy your hunger, and foster conversations about your long day of hiking or paddling.

Tasty outdoor meals are a simple comfort fix that can exponentially enhance your backcountry experience.

There are many meal options available, however, there are three important things to consider when developing your meal plan: caloric content, size/weight, and taste.

Continue reading Master Chef: Ontario Parks backcountry edition

Planes, paddles and portages: a journey of garbage

This is a story about garbage.

It wasn’t a quick journey. It took a plane ride, some paddling in a canoe, portaging, more paddling, another plane ride, and a drive on the highway.

This garbage was left in Algonquin Provincial Park’s remote backcountry, something that, unfortunately, happens far too often.

Continue reading Planes, paddles and portages: a journey of garbage

Fall paddling at Restoule

Imagine. 

You put your canoe or kayak into the lake. The water is smooth and reflective. The sky’s a deep, dark blue, and the clouds are brilliant white. The day is sunny, cool and crisp, and the trees that cover the hills around you…well, they’re a stunning display of red, orange, and yellow.

There’s something special about paddling in Ontario’s provincial parks in the fall, particularly secluded Restoule Provincial Park.

Continue reading Fall paddling at Restoule

An Ontario Parks glossary

Are you new to camping, or maybe a park veteran looking to brush up on your knowledge?

We’ve assembled a handy guide to all the terms you’ll need to know and understand before you visit the park…

Continue reading An Ontario Parks glossary

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park: Trip Planner

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park‘s network of waterways carve the ancient and weathered Canadian Shield, providing endless route possibilities. Here, where “Where nature still rules”, backcountry conditions are constantly changing and park visitors must be prepared to meet nature on its own terms.

Continue reading Woodland Caribou Provincial Park: Trip Planner

Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, Information Specialist at Quetico Provincial Park

Summertime means puppy playtime!

Dogs love the opportunity to be outside as much as you do. A little planning means every family member is happy and safe in the backcountry.

Continue reading Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Backcountry vegetarian cooking

Today’s post comes from Brittany Thatcher and Jill Legault of Quetico Provincial Park.

Going meatless on hiking excursions, canoe trips, or any outdoor adventures can be easy, nutritious, and delicious!

Vegetables and vegetable-based products can provide you with the energy and protein needed to lead successful trips.

Continue reading Backcountry vegetarian cooking

Quetico’s backcountry routes without portages

This post comes from Park Information Specialist Jill Legault of Quetico Provincial Park.

“Portaging is like hitting yourself on the head with a hammer: it feels so good when you stop.” — Bill Mason

Did you know Quetico Provincial Park’s solitary wilderness experience and pristine nature is available without portaging?

Continue reading Quetico’s backcountry routes without portages