April vacancy highlights (roofed accommodation)

Spring temperatures can be tough to predict, which is what makes April a great month to stay in a cabin or yurt! Whether it rains, snows or shines, you’ll have a cozy homebase for your outdoor adventures.

Don’t see your favourite park? Reminder that many parks, such as Arrowhead, Silent Lake and Windy Lake, close after March Break to prepare for the spring camping season.

Accommodations featured below were available as of 12:00 pm, March 15, 2018.

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Backcountry routes without portages

This blog comes from David Legros, a Natural Heritage Education Specialist at Algonquin Provincial Park, and lover of backcountry camping. 

There you are, standing on the rocky shore of a lake. A windswept pine sits behind you, and a wild landscape before you. Welcome to backcountry camping!

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Keeping up with the Canada Jay

Today’s blog post comes from bird researchers Alex Sutton and Koley Freeman, PhD candidates at the University of Guelph.

In the world of Gray Jays, winter means one thing: it’s breeding season!

Gray Jays, also known as Canada Jays, are common in Algonquin Provincial Park. Continuing a 54-year-old tradition, a dedicated team of researchers is monitoring breeding pairs. This is the longest study of its kind in the world!

With each passing year, more is learned about the breeding behaviour and life history of these remarkable birds.

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March Break 2018

During the long winter months, many of us get less “Vitamin N” than usual.

Yet contact with nature has been found to lower blood pressure, strengthen immune system, help prevent disease, and reduce stress levels.

Outdoor time is thought to have important contributions to children’s cognitive, emotional, social, and educational development. Likewise, as exposure to nature rises, children’s stress levels decrease and their self-worth increases.

Keen to spend time in nature with your family this March Break? Here’s a list of fun happenings across the province.

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Support Algonquin Provincial Park!

The car ride to our favourite destination always seems to take forever. We always look for special landmarks along the way to let us know we’re getting close.

Some of these landmarks are special to you, but others are truly iconic. They let you know that you have “arrived”. For lovers of Algonquin Provincial Park, the birch bark map is that iconic landmark.

As part of the Ontario Parks’ 125th anniversary, we’re asking Ontarians to help us fund five legacy projects across the province.

Algonquin’s legacy project is to refurbish and update the park’s iconic sign to provide a warm, familiar welcome to visitors for years to come.

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March vacancy highlights (roofed accommodation)

March is your last chance for a winter adventure!

Now’s the time to experience the beauty of winter in Ontario Parks. We’re pretty full for March Break, however we have lots of other availability throughout the month.

Stay warm and cozy at Ontario Parks this March in one of our roofed accommodations! We’ve got lots of cabins, cottages and yurts available all month, especially for midweek visitors!

Accommodations featured below were available as of 12:00 pm, February 15, 2018.

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5 walks through winter woods

The health benefits of hiking are head-to-toe. A walk in the woods can help alleviate mental fatigue, and improve creative thinking. Hiking is also great for cardiovascular health and muscle tone.

But is hiking an option in the winter?

Absolutely. We’ve collected a list of five parks with stellar options for winter rambles:

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Gray jays: the real early birds

Ontario Parks is recognizing iconic Canadian wildlife species this year to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday. First up is the gray jay, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s pick for the official bird of Canada.

“The early bird gets the worm” usually makes us think of robins. But the real early bird isn’t Robin Red-Breast. It’s the gray jay, also known as the whiskeyjack or Canada jay.

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Where to skate in Ontario Parks

The air is crisp and clean. The evergreens are covered with snow. If you’re lucky – and observant – you might spot a cardinal, a finch, a waxwing or a blue jay as you glide along the ice.

And when the sun goes down, you can huddle around a big bonfire with a cup of hot chocolate and warm up before relacing your skates and heading back out to skate under the stars.

It’s simply magical.

This winter, plan a skating trip to these four provincial parks:

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