How to successfully camp in the rain

Is the forecast looking a little rainy for your upcoming camping trip?

Don’t let it bring you down! Some of the best memories happen on the rainiest days.

All you need are a few tips and tricks to ensure you’re prepared for inclement weather. Keep these tips in mind even if the forecast calls for sunny skies!

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Why is that a rule?

Excessive noise. Transporting firewood. Have you ever wondered why certain rules exist?

Thought, research, and science go into the laws and policies that cover provincial parks and conservation reserves. And it helps to understand the rationale.

Today, we’re sharing the logic behind a few of the rules our visitors ask us about most frequently:

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Considerate Camper: keep our trees healthy

Welcome to our “Considerate Camper” series. These are posts with tips and reminders on how to keep our provincial parks clean and healthy. Already know how it’s done? Please share these posts along for less-experienced campers 🙂

We’re taking a leaf out of the Lorax’s book and speaking for the trees today!

When maintaining our campgrounds, we often notice marks in our trees. Many are from axes and nails, and plenty of trees have names, shapes and initials carved across their bark.

Did you know these holes and gouges risk the tree’s health and may result in its destruction?

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What it’s like to fly in and paddle out of Wabakimi

In today’s post, influencer Ken Jones recounts his backcountry trip to Wabakimi.

This past year was interesting to say the least. The global pandemic has changed a lot about how we travel. After having to cancel a trip to Alaska in September, my wife and I wanted to explore somewhere in Ontario where we’d not yet been.

As avid canoe trippers, we decided to plan a wilderness canoe trip to arguably one of the more remote areas of Ontario: Wabakimi Provincial Park.

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#ForTheLoveOfParks: 5 ways to help keep parks clean and safe this year

Last year, Ontario’s protected areas experienced record-breaking demand.

Ontario Parks received 11 million visits, and Parks Canada reported over 2 million visits.

That’s 13 million visits to Ontario’s provincial and national parks in one year. That’s roughly equivalent to the population of Ontario!

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10 low-waste solutions for your next camping trip

Today’s post comes from Jessie Robinson, a Discovery staff member at Samuel de Champlain Provincial Park.

As we become a more environmentally conscious generation, we are paying more attention to how our own lifestyle habits may be affecting the environment.

We strive to reduce our waste, use our reusable and recycle our recyclables, but when it comes to vacation time, we may slip up on our eco-friendly habits. It’s easy to put these values on the back burner during a camping trip where you want everything to be as easy as possible so you can maximize your enjoyment outdoors.

So here are ten simple solutions on how to keep it green in Ontario Parks while still having fun in nature!

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Don’t bring plants from home!

Our parks protect some of the most biodiverse places in Ontario, and this biodiversity includes an enormous number of native plant species.

From giant Tulip Trees in the south to small ancient White Cedars on the Niagara Escarpment, north to carnivorous wildflowers (and the infamous Poison Ivy almost everywhere) — plants are the basis of our forest food chains.

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Keep it down: a quiet camper is a respectful one

You’re at the park. You’ve set up your site, and now you can spend the evening relaxing.

You had a long drive, and you are unwinding by talking to your friends and playing music. There’s no harm in that right?

In steps the park warden.

You may be surprised when a park warden stops by your site to ask you to quiet down a little, but their job is to make sure everyone is having a peaceful stay. Loud campers can irritate your neighbours and the wildlife in the park.

Here are five noisy habits to avoid on your next visit to the park.

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Can we bring painted rocks to the park?

Art and nature go together like columbine flowers and hummingbird tongues.

Indigenous artists express their relationship to land through art; Canada’s Group of Seven found inspiration in several Ontario Parks; parks offer residency programs, and our park visitors find many artistic ways to capture their memories. We love it when visitors share their artistic creations with us.

However, a new trend is starting to cause problems province-wide: the painted rock.

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