Try a regular dose of camping for good health

Instead of reaching for the medicine cabinet, it may be time to reach for our sleeping bags and tents. Research shows that camping in nature is good for our mental and physical well-being.

What better reason to head out with family and friends into the great outdoors and sleep under the stars?

Check out the brain and body benefits of camping:

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Saved by the fence

Happy World Turtle Day! Today’s post comes from Shannon McGaffey, our Assistant Park Biologist at Algonquin Provincial Park.

Earlier this month, a crew of seven park staff – rangers, maintenance workers, administration staff and biologists – spent the entire day installing turtle fencing along the side of the busy Highway 60 in Algonquin.

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Why is biodiversity important?

Biodiversity is a big word for the variety of life on Earth.

Biodiversity is you – and every other living thing on the planet. We see biodiversity every day, but it’s more than bugs and animals and trees. It’s about how everything is connected. If we lose one piece of biodiversity, the rest is affected.

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Campsite vacancy highlights: May 20-23

Looks like Ontario’s getting great weather for the Victoria Day long weekend, and it’s not too late to book a camping getaway!

In northern, central and southern Ontario, many parks still have a good selection of sites available, especially for tent campers. In the north, there are even a few roofed accommodations available!

Scout out your ideal campsite on our Campsite Browsing/Reservation tool (including pictures of most campsites!), or check out these featured campsites (available as of noon, May 19):

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Could I use your phone? Crowdsourcing science

You’re out in the woods and a bird flies by. Not sure what is it? There’s an app for that.

Today’s smartphones make ideal field guides. Photograph a butterfly sipping nectar. Video a slow-moving turtle. Record a birdsong. Then look it up, find a match, and enter your geotagged observations in a virtual field book.

These virtual field guides often support citizen science. You just share what you see. Scientists, researchers and conservationists use the crowdsourced data to look at climate change, track migration and monitor species at risk and sensitive ecosystems.

Here are a few popular apps:

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The boreal forest: Ontario’s songbird nursery

Today’s post comes from Natural Heritage Education and Marketing Specialist Dave Sproule.

Migrating birds are already arriving along the edges of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, and many southern parks have birding events and festivals.

But for most of the migrants, these parks are just a rest stop after crossing those big stretches of water. Their destination may be much further north: the boreal forest.

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What makes spring so green?

Spring invigorates us, renews us, and makes us optimistic. Leaves sprout, flowers bloom, and birds sing. Winter is gone (mostly), and we can look forward to warmer sunny days.

We get excited about spring because of colour too. Green leaves mean summer is just around the corner.

If we look a bit closer though, we’ll see that there’s more than just green in the forest…

Continue reading What makes spring so green?