The beaver: architect of biodiversity

Today, we join Natural Heritage Education Specialist Dave Sproule for a chat about the ecological and cultural significance of the beaver, which became Canada’s official symbol in 1975.

We all know beavers are industrious. They builds dams, canals and sturdy homes called lodges, which are warm in winter. They repair all those dams and collect enough food to survive long northern winters.

We know beavers are well-suited to the Canadian environment. Beavers are amphibious – more at home in the water than on land — with webbed hind feet, nostrils that can close, a third see-through eyelid that protects the eye when they’re underwater, and a big flat tail that acts as rudder while swimming.

The biggest reason to celebrate the beaver, however, is that the beaver built Canada, shaping both its historical and ecological landscape.

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Healing in the forest: a guide to forest bathing

Happy International Day of Forests!

Let’s take a walk in the woods.

With no specific destination in mind, we will wander, observe and immerse ourselves in nature. Allow our senses to guide us.

When was the last time you walked into the woods with no plans? No final destination? Without a species to ID, hill to climb, or lookout to conquer?

This is exactly the experience offered by a forest bathing session.

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Backcountry for beginners: the best destinations

When executed safely, your first backcountry trip forges lifelong memories, opening an immersive getaway into nature.

But the leap from car camping to backcountry requires preparation and learning. New paddlers and hikers can find themselves in serious trouble if they overestimate their skills or choose a too-challenging route.

Here are some recommended trips for backcountry beginners:

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Stop bears from snacking on your food

Good news, campers! Our parks are implementing new ways to deter bears and other wild critters from making off with your dinner.

Read about which parks offer bear-resistant storage containers and how you can use them during your trips.

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Pimachiowin Aki: a journey

Today’s post was written by Doug Gilmore, a recently retired superintendent of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park. The post commemorates the designation of Pimachiowin Aki as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

A journey can be defined as “the act of travelling from one place to another.” With every accomplishment there is often a journey, and the inscription of Pimachiowin Aki (Pi-MATCH-o-win Ah-KAY) as an UNESCO World Heritage Site was no exception.

Journeys also often include twists and turns and, most importantly, learning as you travel.

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Tundra Swans at Pinery

Imagine you’re standing in Pinery Provincial Park.

You close your eyes and take in the peace of nature all around you. All of the sudden, a loud yodel interrupts the quiet! That unbelievable sound is actually thousands of birds yodeling en masse as they fly over the park in search of their next feeding ground.

This unforgettable experience is courtesy of the Tundra Swan.

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April vacancy highlights (roofed accommodation)

Spring temperatures can be tough to predict, which is what makes April a great month to stay in a cabin or yurt! Whether it rains, snows or shines, you’ll have a cozy homebase for your outdoor adventures.

Don’t see your favourite park? Reminder that many parks, such as Arrowhead, Silent Lake and Windy Lake, close after March Break to prepare for the spring camping season.

Accommodations featured below were available as of 12:00 pm, March 18, 2019.
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5 life-changing paddling routes of Northeastern Ontario

Whether you’re planning a scenic day trip or a rugged backcountry adventure, Northeastern Ontario is a paddler’s playground.

Last year, Northeastern Ontario Tourism asked their readers to vote for their top paddling destinations…

…and the votes are in!

Join us in counting down the top 5 paddling destinations of Northeastern Ontario:

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St. Patrick’s Day “green”ery

Our parks are wearing the green this St. Patrick’s Day and you don’t have to be Irish to appreciate it!

“You do need to be observant, though,” says Algonquin Provincial Park biologist Alison Lake. “But it will be well worth the effort.”

Taking St. Patrick’s Day stroll? Here are 7 shades of green you might spot in our parks:

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7 reasons to book a winter stay at Quetico’s Log Cabin

Today’s post comes from Laura Myers, a Learning and Education Leader with Ontario Parks’ Northwest Zone.

Nestled under tall pines beside French Lake, Quetico’s Provincial Park’s Log Cabin provides a quintessentially Quetico experience with the comforts and convenience of home.

Here are seven reasons the Log Cabin is the ultimate winter getaway:

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