Birding with benefits: therapeutic benefits of bird watching

Birdwatching is a time-honoured tradition that many people enjoy today, offering the opportunity to switch off from the modern world and get back to nature.

Whether you’re simply investing in a bird feeder for your backyard or going for a walk in your local park, birding is beneficial to both your mind and body.

It is renowned for being a meditative exercise where you are fully present in the moment.

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How to connect with nature in your everyday life

Many of us now live in fast-paced urban landscapes or busy suburban neighborhoods, spending most of our time in front of our computers, tvs, and phones.

While it’s easy to be disconnected from nature, studies show that staying connected to nature is critical for both our health and happiness. From fighting  depression to stress, and even fatigue, there are so many benefits to getting outside.

Remember that nature isn’t always a destination; it can also be found in your own backyard!

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First Day Hike destinations

New Year’s Day is coming up fast — have you picked out a park for your First Day Hike?

This 10-park list rounds up some top options for your first foray into 2021:

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A beginner’s guide to snowshoeing

This winter, outdoor activities and staying close to home are both great ideas to keep you happy and healthy! It’s the perfect time to try something new – like snowshoeing!

For any winter activity, planning ahead and a bit of research can go a long way to make sure you day is safe and fun!

Luckily, the outdoor experts at SAIL have shared their best snowshoeing advice to help guarantee a great experience.

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Nature matters and so do you

We know how much nature matters – and we know you do too! That’s why Ontario Parks asked you for your opinion last year during our Healthy Parks Healthy People (HPHP) consultation.

And you responded!

We received more than 2,500 responses from researchers, members of the healthcare sector, environmental groups, Indigenous organizations, educators, and members of the public!

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This is your brain on nature!

Nature? We’re here for it and so are our friends at Coleman Canada. Read on to find out how they’re helping us encourage Ontarians to spend more time outside!

It’s easy to feel a bit low at this time of year. It seems to get dark outside immediately after lunch, the sun is elusive, and our bodies are still adapting to cooler temperatures.

There’s a part of our brain that really wants to hibernate.

But we’re going to fight that urge, and you should too! Here’s why: our brains need nature! Continue reading This is your brain on nature!

Why it’s important for children to play outside in winter

Every winter, as the temperatures drop, so does the amount of time we spend outside. This is especially true for children — playtime can become limited to the indoors.

It may be tempting to hide inside until the weather warms up, but outdoor play is essential for your children’s well-being all year long.

Here are some of the top reasons why you should get our kids outside and active this winter:

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Waldeinsamkeit: solitude in the forest

Picture this: you’re alone, deep into a forested trail. Your only companions are the birds fluttering from branch to branch around you. As you walk, you follow a corridor made of pillars of ancient trees, and smell the earthy aroma of moss and damp leaves.

How do you feel? It’s hard to describe, but the words which immediately come to mind are calm, peaceful, and contemplative. You feel a deep-rooted connection to the world around you, and you are reminded of the importance of our natural environment.

There’s a word for that feeling: waldeinsamkeit.

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