Bronte Creek’s annual coyote howl

Did reading this title send chills down your spine? Did your heart beat just a little faster with the thought that you might hear a coyote?

Each New Year’s Eve since 2000, Bronte Creek Provincial Park has rung in — or, more accurately — howled in the new year.

You can be part of the park’s coyote howl tradition this December 31.

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When the student becomes the teacher

Today’s post comes from Jessica Stillman, School Outreach Coordinator for Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

Bronte Creek Provincial Park is a unique setting, with rich natural and historical features. As the School Outreach Coordinator at the park, I get to connect students to this wonderful site on a daily basis!

Let me tell you a little about myself and the programs we offer:

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Discovery and trails go together like peanut butter and jelly

In our “Behind the Scenes” series, Discovery Program staff across the province share a “backstage” glimpse of their favourite programs and projects. Today’s post comes from David Bree, Discovery Program Lead at Presqu’ile Provincial Park.

Trails and parks go together like (fill in your favourite pairing here: “like peas and carrots,” as Forrest Gump would say). Trails are arguably the most used recreational facility in our park system.

But trails don’t just happen; first a concept must be born.

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Quetico’s wilderness voices

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, an information specialist at Quetico Provincial Park.

Quetico’s oral histories have been locked away on archival cassettes at the John B. Ridley Research Library — until now.

Courtesy of history enthusiasts from the University of Wisconsin Whitewater, they have come out of the vault and into our ears.

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Bon Echo’s Wanderer Tour

Today’s “Behind the scenes” blog comes from Caitie Carney,  a member of Bon Echo’s Discovery Program team.

If you asked visitors at Bon Echo Provincial Park “What keeps you coming back?”, the answer you’d probably hear is “Mazinaw Rock.”

Standing 92 m (300 feet) above Mazinaw Lake, Mazinaw Rock is a spectacle that commands the attention of visitors both on land and on water.

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Dressing up like it’s 1900!

Today’s post comes from Nicole Bucik, a Senior Park Interpreter at Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in the Victorian era?

When walking around Spruce Lane Farm at Bronte Creek Provincial Park, you might think to yourself: have I stepped back in time?

Seeing park staff in suits and gowns tending to farm animals might seem odd, but it’s a seasonal feature here at Bronte Creek.

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From schooling to teaching at Rondeau

Today’s post comes from Kevin Gevaert, a Discovery Guide at Rondeau Provincial Park.

I am a student Discovery Guide here at Rondeau Provincial Park. This will be my fourth year as an interpreter in the Discovery Program.

Let me tell you about my journey in parks.

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The story behind Emily Provincial Park’s pollinator garden

Today’s post comes from Alexander Renaud, a Discovery Program Lead at Emily Provincial Park.

In the summer of 2018, our Discovery staff at Emily Provincial Park wanted to do something BIG to help the park.

Previous years have seen the instillation of turtle nest protection boxes, the collection of species data through a BioBlitz, and the design and creation of a new trail system.

Last summer, we decided upon creating a pollinator garden!

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Working at Pancake Bay Provincial Park

Today’s post comes from Kathleen Boston, a Discovery Leader at Pancake Bay Provincial Park. 

Three years ago, I applied to spend my summer working at Pancake Bay Provincial Park. It was one of the best decisions I ever made!

Thankfully I was chosen to work as a gate attendant for my first year. In my second year I moved to the maintenance department, and now, in my third year, I am part of the Discovery Program team.

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The Ontario Parks Discovery Program: 75 years in the making

In 1944, Algonquin Provincial Park decided to try something new.

They hired Professor J.R. Dymond, Director of the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology, to deliver guided hikes for park visitors. Those first interpretive programs were a success and what would become the Ontario Parks Discovery Program was born.

Seventy-five years later, roughly 300 Discovery staff in over 70 parks continue to engage visitors with stories of Ontario’s natural and cultural heritage and encourage them to explore further.

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