Keep it down: a quiet camper is a respectful one

You’re at the park. You’ve set up your site, and now you can spend the evening relaxing.

You had a long drive, and you are unwinding by talking to your friends and playing music. There’s no harm in that right?

In steps the park warden.

You may be surprised when a park warden stops by your site to ask you to quiet down a little, but their job is to make sure everyone is having a peaceful stay. Loud campers can irritate your neighbours and the wildlife in the park.

Here are five noisy habits to avoid on your next visit to the park.

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How to leave the park greener than you found it

Today’s post comes from Sheila Wiebe, a marketing and development specialist at Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

I promise to be greener.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m already pretty green. However, after leading an Earth Day park clean up, I decided I need to take it one step further and double up my efforts to further reduce my impact on the environment.

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5 reasons to visit Earl Rowe Provincial Park

With hundreds of parks in Ontario, it’s easy to overlook one that’s right next door.

But you don’t need to drive far for great camping options!

Here are five reasons you should consider Earl Rowe Provincial Park when you’re planning your next (or your first!) camping adventure.

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It’s June — what are Black Bears up to?

Planning a visit and wondering whether you’ll see a Black Bear? Tune in to our monthly Black Bear feature where our ecologists let you know common bear behaviour for the month or season.

Love is in the air in June for some Black Bears!

It’s mating season, which runs from about mid-May through July.

It’s more important than ever to practice bear safety throughout your visit!

Here’s what our bears are up to this month:

Continue reading It’s June — what are Black Bears up to?

Camping comfortably with bugs

Today’s post was written by Emma Fuller, a Discovery guide at Bon Echo Provincial Park

A lot is left to chance when you’re planning a summer camping trip. You can’t always ensure sunny weather, quiet car rides, or calm paddling waters.

However, one thing is certain if you’re heading into the outdoors, you’re definitely going to encounter the pesky buzz of Ontario’s biting insects!

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5 reasons to visit Rondeau Provincial Park

Wondering where to go for your summer vacation?

Look no further, because Rondeau Provincial Park might just be the perfect getaway for you and your family!

Located on Lake Erie, Rondeau is a host of incredible biodiversity. There’s plenty to see and do during your trip, and lots to explore, from sandy dunes to beautiful Carolinian forests.

Here are five reasons we think you should plan a trip to Rondeau:

Continue reading 5 reasons to visit Rondeau Provincial Park

It’s May — what are Black Bears up to?

Planning a visit and wondering whether you’ll see a Black Bear? Tune in to our monthly Black Bear feature where our ecologists let you know common bear behaviour for the month or season.

Spring is upon us, and Ontario’s Black Bears are ready for another season of eating to gain fat for winter hibernation.

While young bear cubs are sticking close to their moms, yearling bears (bears that are about a year and a half) may be leaving and striking out on their own for the first time in search of food. (Your actions really make a difference for young Black Bears this month!)

Here’s what our bears are up to this month:

Continue reading It’s May — what are Black Bears up to?

Kettle Lakes: a land shaped by icebergs

The deep green boreal forest of Kettle Lakes Provincial Park contains 22 beautiful little lakes. Of these lakes, 20 are called actually “kettle lakes” by geographers.

So what is a “kettle lake?”

To answer that question, we first must look at how kettles are formed.

Continue reading Kettle Lakes: a land shaped by icebergs