Your guide to winter yurt and cabin camping

So, you still haven’t had enough of the outdoors, even though winter has arrived?

Neither have we!

Day-tripping to your favourite park is a great way to get outside, but maybe you’ve decided to try an overnight stay in the winter. Great choice!

Yurt and cabins are a popular way to experience winter at Ontario Parks. Stay warm and cozy while you enjoy all a park has to offer in the winter, from watching early morning sunlight reach across fresh snow, to skiing or snowshoeing through the forest as the snowflakes drift down.

Here’s everything you need to know for your winter adventure.

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10 ways to enjoy winter at Quetico

Today’s post comes from Quetico Superintendent Trevor Gibb.

Quetico Provincial Park is primarily known for its world class backcountry canoeing opportunities.

However, once the lakes freeze and snow blankets the forest, the park transforms into a wilderness winter wonderland.

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6 essential items to pack for your winter hike

Trail guide and cellphone and water in bottles,
Flashlight just in case your hike is a dawdle,
High energy snacks secured with drawstrings,
These are a few of our essential things… (can’t you just hear Maria von Trapp’s voice?)

A walk through a pine tree forest in crunchy snow can be dreamy, however your snowy paradise can go south quickly if you’re missing important items.

Being prepared with a few essentials in your bag will help keep you safe on your adventure. Here are six items that should always be in your day pack on a winter hike:

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December’s digital download

The best part of winter?

Mother Nature debuts her annual colour palette, with shades of blue, grey, green, and white painted across the province.

This month’s FREE digital download comes from Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Throughout 2022, we’re sharing a free downloadable graphic for you to use as wallpaper for your favourite devices. We’ve specially sized these images for your  computers, tablets, smartphones, and Facebook covers.

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Your winter preparedness guide

If you’re reading this, you’re likely a not-very-furry mammal with a core body temperature around 37ºC.

Your body works very hard to maintain this temperature. If it drops even a few degrees, moving, thinking, and other basic tasks become difficult. You will need to warm up quickly, or you may find yourself in a dangerous situation.

To prevent cold-related emergencies, it’s important to plan your winter adventures with care.

Here’s what you need to know to stay safe in cold weather:

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A beginner’s guide to cross-country skiing

Picture this: you’re gliding through a glittering, snow-covered forest. You hear bird calls, and see signs of forest life all around you.

There’s no better way to enjoy winter at Ontario Parks than on a set of skis.

If you’re not a cross-country skier already, here are some beginner tips to get you started.

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5 ways to stay active in the cold

Brrr! Temperatures are dropping, and winter’s icy grip is almost upon us.

We bet you’re feeling just about ready to tuck into a nice, long winter’s hibernation. Not so fast! Outdoor activity is important for our mental and physical health all year long. Getting outside is good for you even when the weather is not ideal.

Ontario Parks has 31 parks open in the winter. Each park offers plenty of ways for you to get active in the chilly months.

Here are some great ways to stay healthy, and enjoy winter!

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Underground, underwater or frozen solid: how do frogs & toads spend the winter?

Today’s post comes from David LeGros, one of our Algonquin Provincial Park naturalists.

As the crisp fall days get colder and the occasional dusting of snow whitens the landscape, we know that winter is just around the corner. For the countless songbirds of our forests, they avoid our cold winters and lack of food by migrating south.

Other animals are adapted to the cold conditions and may grow a thicker coat of fur or feathers. Some, we think, have the enviable ability to sleep away the long Ontario winter by hibernating.

Continue reading Underground, underwater or frozen solid: how do frogs & toads spend the winter?