4 tips for a safe hike

Nothing beats hitting the trails on a beautiful summer day.

It’s important to be prepared for anything, especially if you’re new to hiking at Ontario Parks or any other wilderness trail.

We teamed up with our friends at Taste of Nature to create these key tips to make sure you have a safe and enjoyable trip:
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Why is that a rule?

Excessive noise. Transporting firewood. Have you ever wondered why certain rules exist?

Thought, research, and science go into the laws and policies that cover provincial parks and conservation reserves. And it helps to understand the rationale.

Today, we’re sharing the logic behind a few of the rules our visitors ask us about most frequently:

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Considerate Camper: keep our trees healthy

Welcome to our “Considerate Camper” series. These are posts with tips and reminders on how to keep our provincial parks clean and healthy. Already know how it’s done? Please share these posts along for less-experienced campers 🙂

We’re taking a leaf out of the Lorax’s book and speaking for the trees today!

When maintaining our campgrounds, we often notice marks in our trees. Many are from axes and nails, and plenty of trees have names, shapes and initials carved across their bark.

Did you know these holes and gouges risk the tree’s health and may result in its destruction?

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Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, Information Specialist at Quetico Provincial Park. 

Summertime means puppy playtime!

Dogs love the opportunity to be outside as much as you do. A little planning means every family member is happy and safe in the backcountry.

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What to do when garbage bins are full

Access to green space and parks continues to be more essential than ever.

With so many visitors enjoying campsites, parks, and beaches this summer, it has resulted in an influx of food and garbage left behind.

This excess waste creates a dangerous situation when it is not disposed of properly. We’d like to ask our visitors to follow responsible garbage can etiquette on their next visit.

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How to be a Bear Wise visitor

Black Bears live across Ontario in forested areas where they can find enough food, shelter, and denning sites. Our provincial parks are their home, and over 90% of our parks are in bear country.

A safe bear sighting during one of your adventures with Ontario Parks can be a lasting memory. Educating yourself about bears before your visit is important and the mark of a responsible park visitor.

We want to share space with bears, keeping our human visitors and all our wildlife residents safe.

If you’re planning a visit, here are some important safety tips about Black Bears:

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#ForTheLoveOfParks: 5 ways to help keep parks clean and safe this year

Last year, Ontario’s protected areas experienced record-breaking demand.

Ontario Parks received 11 million visits, and Parks Canada reported over 2 million visits.

That’s 13 million visits to Ontario’s provincial and national parks in one year. That’s roughly equivalent to the population of Ontario!

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Say “no” to axe-idents

You’ve just paddled your heart out to get to your campsite. You put on your flannel and grab your axe to prepare your campfire.

Something about being in the wilderness that brings out our inner woodsperson.

We know the feeling.

However, for the preservation of your toes, please read this before you swing that axe!

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Worst of the worst: a naturalist’s list of the most harmful types of litter

Today Yvette Bree, a Discovery Leader at Sandbanks Provincial Park for over 30 years, shares some thoughts about this season. 

2020 will go down as — to put it mildly — a difficult year for many people.

Although affected by the world around me, I choose to acknowledge that I am pretty lucky: I live in a great country, a great province, and have enjoyed a career in a stunningly beautiful park.

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Keep it down: a quiet camper is a respectful one

You’re at the park. You’ve set up your site, and now you can spend the evening relaxing.

You had a long drive, and you are unwinding by talking to your friends and playing music. There’s no harm in that right?

In steps the park warden.

You may be surprised when a park warden stops by your site to ask you to quiet down a little, but their job is to make sure everyone is having a peaceful stay. Loud campers can irritate your neighbours and the wildlife in the park.

Here are five noisy habits to avoid on your next visit to the park.

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