Fall paddling safety

Fall is the perfect time to paddle.

As the temperatures cool there are no bugs and the lakes become less crowded. Plus you can catch some of our beautiful fall colours!

But fall weather can be fickle. Hitting the lake too late, failing to respect weather conditions, or paddling beyond your skill level isn’t just risky — it’s downright dangerous.

We chatted with Paul Smith, Superintendent of Kawartha Highlands Signature Site, to get some top do’s and don’ts for fall paddling safety:

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Restoule: a fall colours paradise

When we hear the words “fall colours,” our minds often jump to Algonquin. Trouble is, Algonquin’s gotten so popular that autumn brings long line-ups, crowded trails, and traffic-snarling “leaf jams.”

So where can we go to see awe-inspiring fall colours, hike to breathtaking lookouts, and avoid the crowds?

Restoule Provincial Park.

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Temagami: an ancient canoe country

Today’s post comes from Natural Heritage Education and Marketing Specialist Dave Sproule.

It’s a rugged, time-worn landscape. A fractured piece of the Canadian Shield, with fault lines criss-crossing the roots of ancient mountains for hundreds of kilometres. More than 2,500 lakes fill those fault lines, and at over 600,000 hectares, it’s almost as large as Algonquin Provincial Park.

Is it any wonder so many paddlers lose their hearts to Temagami?

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June’s digital download

We just had to include a canoe in this month’s free digital download. Add it to your device and celebrate National Paddling Week (June 10-18, 2017) and National Canoe Day (June 24).

This month’s photo was snapped at Esker Lakes Provincial Park. The collection of picturesque lakes makes the park ideal for canoeing. Keep an eye out for wildlife, especially near the many wetlands. Rentals are available, including paddles and personal flotation devices.

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2016 Frontenac Challenge wrap-up

Today’s post comes from Content Development Specialist Evan Holt. This is Evan’s fourth year completing the Frontenac Challenge!

Frontenac Provincial Park offers a unique challenge to autumn visitors that isn’t found elsewhere in the province. About half-way through my first attempt at hiking the complete 160 km of the challenge I found myself falling in love with the park.

Here’s a quick look at a growing destination for hikers, campers, canoeists and trail runners.

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Wooden canoe- and paddle-making in Ontario

Wooden canoes and paddles are closely linked to Ontarians’ collective sense of history. For centuries, rivers and lakes were the railways of their time: traversing our waterways by canoe was how Indigenous people and early European settlers explored this vast country.

Ontario is known as the “canoe capital” of the world for good reason. Our endless lake and river routes run from the far north of the province to the U.S. border.

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Welcome to Grey Owl country

Archie Belaney — the man many know as “Grey Owl” — dreamed of living in the wilds of Canada. Here’s how the now-famous author, public speaker and early Canadian environmentalist described the North Country:

It is a land of shadows and hidden trails, lost rivers and unknown lakes, a region of soft-footed creatures going their noiseless ways over the carpet of moss, and there is silence, intense, absolute and all-embracing.”

The following film retraces conservationist Grey Owl’s path through the northeastern Ontario’s legendary Temagami region – n’Daki Menan Aboriginal community.

Experience the old growth forest and beauty that captured Grey Owl’s heart:

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