Fall paddling safety

Fall is the perfect time to paddle.

As the temperatures cool there are no bugs and the lakes become less crowded. Plus you can catch some of our beautiful fall colours!

But fall weather can be fickle. Hitting the lake too late, failing to respect weather conditions, or paddling beyond your skill level isn’t just risky — it’s downright dangerous.

We chatted with Paul Smith, Superintendent of Kawartha Highlands Signature Site, to get some top do’s and don’ts for fall paddling safety:

Continue reading Fall paddling safety

Fall paddling at Restoule

Imagine. 

You put your canoe or kayak into the lake. The water is smooth and reflective. The sky’s a deep, dark blue, and the clouds are brilliant white. The day is sunny, cool and crisp, and the trees that cover the hills around you…well, they’re a stunning display of red, orange, and yellow.

There’s something special about paddling in Ontario’s provincial parks in the fall, particularly secluded Restoule Provincial Park.

Continue reading Fall paddling at Restoule

Restoule: a fall colours paradise

When we hear the words “fall colours,” our minds often jump to Algonquin. Trouble is, Algonquin’s gotten so popular that autumn brings long line-ups, crowded trails, and traffic-snarling “leaf jams.”

So where can we go to see awe-inspiring fall colours, hike to breathtaking lookouts, and avoid the crowds?

Restoule Provincial Park.

Continue reading Restoule: a fall colours paradise

The ultimate fall adventure destination: paddle, bike and hike at Restoule Provincial Park

Influencer Diana Lee lives for adventure, the great outdoors, and stand-up paddleboarding (SUP)! Find out what she’s (S)UP to @only1phoenixx on Instagram and Twitter.

Experience the magic of fall at a park that has it all: Restoule Provincial Park!

From tranquil paddling routes to scenic trails for hikers or mountain bikers, there is something for everyone! And this quiet park does not hold back on the vibrant fall colours!

Continue reading The ultimate fall adventure destination: paddle, bike and hike at Restoule Provincial Park

Backcountry basics: know your limits

You’ve heard about this fantastic new adventure through a friend, route guide, or Instagram. It looks kind of tough, and you’re pretty new to the whole backcountry thing.

Still, you don’t want to miss out, so you decide to go for it.

But as you start planning, there’s a little voice wondering if this is really the best idea.

Listen to that voice.

Continue reading Backcountry basics: know your limits

Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, Information Specialist at Quetico Provincial Park

Summertime means puppy playtime!

Dogs love the opportunity to be outside as much as you do. A little planning means every family member is happy and safe in the backcountry.

Continue reading Backcountry canoeing with your dog

What it’s like to fly in and paddle out of Wabakimi

In today’s post, influencer Ken Jones recounts his backcountry trip to Wabakimi.

This past year was interesting to say the least. The global pandemic has changed a lot about how we travel. After having to cancel a trip to Alaska in September, my wife and I wanted to explore somewhere in Ontario where we’d not yet been.

As avid canoe trippers, we decided to plan a wilderness canoe trip to arguably one of the more remote areas of Ontario: Wabakimi Provincial Park.

Continue reading What it’s like to fly in and paddle out of Wabakimi

8 ways paddling can improve your health

Just when we thought nothing could top the “good for you” news about chocolate…

…research shows that paddling is good not only for our physical health, but for our mental health as well!

Here are some of the benefits that will have you reaching for your paddle:

Continue reading 8 ways paddling can improve your health

A trip down the Pakeshkag River at Grundy Lake Provincial Park

Today’s post comes from Sonje Bols, a former naturalist at Grundy Lake Provincial Park.

Part of a park naturalist’s job is to familiarize themselves with the natural and cultural wonders of their park through exploration.

Whether it’s tramping through bogs to catch and identify dragonflies, flipping rocks to look for snakes, or canoeing along ancient Indigenous canoe routes, naturalists set out to observe and explore every inch of their parks so they can bring that knowledge and experience to park visitors and managers.

Continue reading A trip down the Pakeshkag River at Grundy Lake Provincial Park

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park: Trip Planner

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park‘s network of waterways carve the ancient and weathered Canadian Shield, providing endless route possibilities. Here, where “Where nature still rules”, backcountry conditions are constantly changing and park visitors must be prepared to meet nature on its own terms.

 

Continue reading Woodland Caribou Provincial Park: Trip Planner