6 essential items to pack for your winter hike

Trail guide and cellphone and water in bottles,
Flashlight just in case your hike is a dawdle,
High energy snacks secured with drawstrings,
These are a few of our essential things… (can’t you just hear Maria von Trapp’s voice?)

A walk through a pine tree forest in crunchy snow can be dreamy, however your snowy paradise can go south quickly if you’re missing important items.

Being prepared with a few essentials in your bag will help keep you safe on your adventure. Here are six items that should always be in your day pack on a winter hike:

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Keeping dogs on-leash protects our parks’ ecological integrity

Today’s blog comes from Emma Dennis, an assistant Discovery Program leader at Killarney Provincial Park.

I am a lover of the outdoors and an avid hiker, so it’s only natural that I own two dogs that share that same passions. As Killarney residents, we are lucky enough to have Killarney Provincial Park as our backyard.

Whether we are hitting the Granite Ridge Trail on a Sunday morning for a quick hike to start our day, or spending the afternoon adventuring to the top of “The Crack,” we live our best lives when we are hiking the trails.

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Discovery and trails go together like peanut butter and jelly

In our “Behind the Scenes” series, Discovery Program staff across the province share a “backstage” glimpse of their favourite programs and projects. Today’s post comes from David Bree, Discovery Program Lead at Presqu’ile Provincial Park.

Trails and parks go together like (fill in your favourite pairing here: “like peas and carrots,” as Forrest Gump would say). Trails are arguably the most used recreational facility in our park system.

But trails don’t just happen; first a concept must be born.

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Hot spots to have a cup of tea in Ontario Parks’ northwest

Today’s post comes from Laura Myers, a tea lover and Marketing Specialist with Ontario Parks.

This blog is dedicated to all of those who love tea and nature.

Whether it’s a cool summer evening, or a chilly winter day, it’s always a good time for tea time. There’s something about having a cup of tea that ignites a sense of stillness and calmness. It reminds you to take a step back, and really take in a moment.

Ontario’s northwest provincial parks provide some stellar backdrops for the most perfect outdoor tea parties. Make a cup of tea, and read on to discover six tea hot spots!

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5 walks through winter woods

The health benefits of hiking are head-to-toe. A walk in the woods can help alleviate mental fatigue, and improve creative thinking. Hiking is also great for cardiovascular health and muscle tone.

But is hiking an option in the winter?

Absolutely. We’ve collected a list of five parks with stellar options for winter rambles:

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5 reasons Sleeping Giant is a backcountry paradise

Today’s post comes from Rachelle Law, Discovery Leader at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Have you been dreaming of finding the perfect park to go backcountry camping?

Well, the secret’s out! With over 100 km of hiking trails and 40 backcountry campsites, Sleeping Giant Provincial Park is a backcountry camper’s oasis!

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Up for a hiking challenge?

For many hikers, fall is peak season for the big challenges. Bugs have fled, temperatures are lower and the autumn leaves are on full display.

If you’re after an exciting new trail this fall, we’ve got three bucket list trips to recommend.

Ready to test your mettle?

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Mississagi: a hiker’s paradise

If you have been to Mississagi Provincial Park, you’ll know that it’s one of Ontario’s best-kept secrets. The scenery is spectacular, thanks to the geology of the area, which forms a series of hills, ridges and cliffs, and valleys with sparkling blue lakes.

Covering the hills and surrounding the lakes are the forests of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region. Sugar maples, red maples and yellow birch make up most of the trees in the forest, but white pine and black spruce find places along the rocky ridges and lake shores. These forests light up in the fall with red, yellow, gold and orange.

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