Discover the hidden archaeological treasures at Bonnechere

Many Ontario Parks offer visitors the chance to step back in time and learn about life from days gone by. But one of the cool things at Bonnechere Provincial Park, 37 km southwest of Pembroke, is that you can hold that history in the palm of your hand.

Artifacts like:

  • An 800 A.D. projectile point, likely from a spear that was dropped along the river by indigenous people who stopped to rest on the banks of the Bonnechere River while canoeing and portaging
  • An 1859 pre-Confederation copper one cent coin bearing the name “Canada” even though our country had yet to be officially formed
  • A 19th Century writing stylus, the type used by school children to scratch out their lessons (obviously before iPads)
  • A clay vessel from the Middle Woodland Period (200 – 300 B.C. to A.D. 700 – 900), detailing a thousand-year-old tradition of ceramics used by the Woodland people

Continue reading Discover the hidden archaeological treasures at Bonnechere

Then and now – 50 years at Rideau River Provincial Park

 In 1957, it was announced that a new provincial park was to be established along the Rideau River.  The new park would feature a campground and a beach for swimming and would be established on land that had once been a forestry station.  This is Rideau River Provincial Park.
 

Continue reading Then and now – 50 years at Rideau River Provincial Park

Fascinating stories at Ontario Parks

Human interest stories are brought to life every year through unique programming at Ontario Parks.

There are no ghosts but the spirit of lumbermen and settlers live on at Bonnechere Provincial Park. The park’s cultural history began thousands of years ago with First Nations travelers. By 1840, settlers began to arrive. Continue reading Fascinating stories at Ontario Parks