How Pancake Bay got its name

Today’s post comes from — you guessed it — Pancake Bay Provincial Park.

Where did the name Pancake Bay come from? The answer changes depending on who you ask.

Ask a local and they’ll tell you one story. Ask a Pancake Bay staff member and they’ll tell you another. Ask a child and they will tell you it’s because the beach is flat like a pancake 😉

But no matter whom you ask, the name is closely tied to the voyageurs.

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Celebrating the summer solstice at Killbear

Aanii kinaweya! Hello everyone!

Christine King n’dizhinikaaz, Wasauksing n’doonjibaa. My name is Christine King and I am from Wasauksing First Nation. I am a park naturalist at Killbear and have already learned so much in my first month in being at the park.

What a beautiful day we had here at Killbear Provincial Park for National Aboriginal Day (or as it is now known: National Indigenous Peoples Day) on June 21, 2017!

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Temagami: an ancient canoe country

Today’s post comes from Natural Heritage Education and Marketing Specialist Dave Sproule.

It’s a rugged, time-worn landscape. A fractured piece of the Canadian Shield, with fault lines criss-crossing the roots of ancient mountains for hundreds of kilometres. More than 2,500 lakes fill those fault lines, and at over 600,000 hectares, it’s almost as large as Algonquin Provincial Park.

Is it any wonder so many paddlers lose their hearts to Temagami?

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Spirit walks and storytellers

When paddling a river or toasting marshmallows, it can be easy to forget the rich cultural history of Ontario’s provincial parks.

We’ve got all kinds of storytelling going on in our parks this August,  especially in the evenings. Care to stop by for a yarn?

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Welcome to Grey Owl country

Archie Belaney — the man many know as “Grey Owl” — dreamed of living in the wilds of Canada. Here’s how the now-famous author, public speaker and early Canadian environmentalist described the North Country:

It is a land of shadows and hidden trails, lost rivers and unknown lakes, a region of soft-footed creatures going their noiseless ways over the carpet of moss, and there is silence, intense, absolute and all-embracing.”

The following film retraces conservationist Grey Owl’s path through the northeastern Ontario’s legendary Temagami region – n’Daki Menan Aboriginal community.

Experience the old growth forest and beauty that captured Grey Owl’s heart:

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Sketching Superior: the Group of Seven in Neys Provincial Park

Today’s post is from Maureen Forrester, Neys Provincial Park’s Natural Heritage Education Leader.

The Group of Seven is a famous group of Canadian artists who formed with the mission to paint the truly rugged landscape of Canada; something they did not feel could be achieved with the popular European artistic style of the time.

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