A trip down the Pakeshkag River at Grundy Lake Provincial Park

Today’s post comes from Sonje Bols, a former naturalist at Grundy Lake Provincial Park.

Part of a park naturalist’s job is to familiarize themselves with the natural and cultural wonders of their park through exploration.

Whether it’s tramping through bogs to catch and identify dragonflies, flipping rocks to look for snakes, or canoeing along ancient Indigenous canoe routes, naturalists set out to observe and explore every inch of their parks so they can bring that knowledge and experience to park visitors and managers.

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Students: find your summer job at Ontario Parks!

“Working up north was the most empowering experience of my life.”

Nineteen-year-old Katie Baillie-David left the comforts of home to drive 10 hours north to the wilds of Nagagamisis Provincial Park, northwest of Timmins. Visitors enjoy the remoteness of the park – the fishing, swimming, northern lights and the quiet, unspoiled landscape – and so did Katie.

What she came away with was a life-changing experience.

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We’re looking for park wardens!

Applications for our 2021 park warden positions are open. Please review the “Park Wardens” section of our careers page, and submit your application using the recruitment contact form. Applications close on March 26.

Ontario Parks currently manages 340 parks. In doing so, we protect over 8.2 million ha of land, lakes and rivers, while providing habitat for over 140 different species at risk. At the same time, we provide recreational opportunities by operating more than 20,000 car campsites, 170 roofed accommodations, and 8,000 backcountry campsites.

How do we do this?

The success of our organization is a direct result of our amazing staff’s hard work. Park wardens are an integral part of our operations, and play a significant role in helping us achieve our goals.

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International Women and Girls in Science Day 2021

Happy International Day of Women and Girls in Science!

Our scientists are absolutely integral to Ontario Parks, working as researchers, biologists, ecologists, and more!

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The incredible legacy of Maw at Sleeping Giant

Today’s post comes from Rachelle Law, Discovery Leader at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Sleeping Giant is known for several things, one of them being our awe-inspiring views of the Sleeping Giant.

Another is our park cleaner nicknamed “Maw”, who is retiring from the park this year.

Working at the park for 39 years, Maw has become part of the true fabric of the park. She has left an extraordinary impact on the park, visitors and staff.

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What goes into closing a park for the winter?

While 31 provincial parks remain open for the winter, the rest hibernate until spring.

But closing a park isn’t as simple as just locking the gates. Our staff put a lot of elbow grease into prepping each park for the winter.

Here are just a few of the tasks we do each fall:

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The great OP retirement tour: Bon Echo

In our second installment of a trip down memory lane, Interpreter, David Bree, regales us with his experiences at Bon Echo Provincial Park

Catch the beginning of the nostalgia tour in the first installment:
Charleston Lake Provincial Park

When people ask me what was my favourite park to work at, I say without hesitation: Bon Echo.

This is as much due to circumstance as the obvious notable physical features and facilities of that park.

I worked at Bon Echo from 1992 to 1999 and went from senior interpreter to leader of the education program in my time there.

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8 questions with an Ontario Parks ecologist

Alison Lake or “Lakie” is an ecologist in our northeast zone, and has earned a reputation as a passionate promoter of ecological integrity.

She has an infectious love of the natural world and is rarely seen without her “bins” (binoculars) around her neck.

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