5 reasons to visit Kap-Kig-Iwan Provincial Park

If the sights and sounds of moving water in nature are refreshing and rejuvenating, then time spent at Kap-Kig-Iwan is liquid medicine!

Situated in the heart of Northern Ontario, Kap-Kig-Iwan Provincial Park is located just off Highway 11, two kilometres south of Englehart, and just north of the Temagami region.

This picturesque little park showcases the best of the boreal forest, with awe-inspiring water features that can’t be missed!

Check out these five reasons to visit Kap-Kig-Iwan:

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It’s aster season!

Today’s post comes to us from Discovery Program Specialist Dave Sproule.

Around the middle of August, Ontario’s landscape starts to change colour. A bit of gold here, swaths of white there, and even a touch of purple in places. No, it’s not fall yet, although the odd maple tree may think so. It’s actually the “second flowering of summer,” and it lasts well into the autumn.

While many of the flowering plants in the landscape have quit for the season, the asters and goldenrods are just getting going.
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The not-too-alike lookalikes: the Massasauga Rattlesnake and the Northern Watersnake

Today’s post comes from the Discovery Program staff at Killbear Provincial Park.

Snakes: some people love them, some people don’t.

However you feel about them, they are an important part of our ecosystems, and you may see one when you visit us.

Here at Killbear, we get a lot of questions about snakes, and especially the difference between watersnakes and rattlesnakes as they are often confused for each other.

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Finding our place in the wild

Today’s post comes from Heather Greenwood Davis, a travel writer and new camper. 

We forgot the kettle. For real campers, it wouldn’t be a big deal. Real campers would know how to build a fire; real campers would’ve thought to bring a pot.

But I’m not a real camper and I am a coffee lover, so this could’ve been a problem.

Luckily, I know enough about my strengths and weaknesses to have arranged to spend this camping experience in one of the roofed accommodations at Bonnechere Provincial Park. The perfect step between tent camping and a cottage stay, our log cabin offers the warmth and security of a roof and four walls, but only a few of the modern conveniences we’re used to.

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Backcountry basics: storing and disposing of food

We don’t know about you, but when we pack food for our backcountry trip, we plan on eating it.

That plan can go downhill quickly when raccoons, squirrels, and bears dip into your trail mix, or rain soaks through your pack, ruining your soft sausage buns.

You want to see a grumpy bear? A weekend away without food will turn us into one in no time!

Instead, learn how to store food and dispose of scraps so you don’t end up with soggy food or, worse, unexpected dinner guests.

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The healing power of nature for seniors

Getting outdoors is important for people of all ages and walks of life.

Getting outside is a great way to relax and soak up the beauty of nature that surrounds us.

Best of all, there are real benefits to enjoying the outdoors, especially for seniors.

Studies are continuously reporting the benefits gained by seniors who spend time in nature.

These are some of the top reasons older adults should make time to get outside each day:

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Chugging along the tracks of time

Today’s post comes from Kelila Seymour, 2021 Discovery Leader at Neys Provincial Park.

While some parks can boast a connection with the Canadian Pacific Railroad (CPR), few parks are “tied” to the railroad as closely as Neys!

Maybe you’ve driven across the tracks when you’ve entered the park, heard the whistle blow as you curl up around an evening fire, or had the chance to paddle under the trussel bridge that spans the Little Pic River.

Surrounding Neys, you are reminded of the CPR and its historical significance to the park and to Canada.

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Sharing is preparing: Why backcountry campers should share their equipment details

When making a reservation for a backcountry camping trip, you will be asked:

A screenshot of the Ontario Parks Backcountry Reservation system, which asks the person booking to describe the type of camping equipment that they are bringing with them.

In the rush to confirm your booking, it can be easy to ignore this request, or to give a quick answer. But have you ever considered why we ask this question? Providing a detailed answer is an important first step in planning a successful trip to the backcountry.

Here’s why.

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What to do when a thunderstorm rolls in

A lot of planning and preparation goes into a camping trip, but sometimes things don’t go according to plan.

Thunderstorms are common in all parts of Ontario from late April to early October. No one plans for a storm to hit during their camping trip, but it’s important to know what to do if a storm rolls in.

Here’s what you need to know to stay safe, no matter the weather:

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