BBQ turkey for Thanksgiving? Why not? Roofed accommodations make Thanksgiving getaways a breeze

This Thanksgiving, why not take the work out of your Thanksgiving dinner and head to your favourite park for a weekend away and a BBQ turkey with all the fixings? After all, you can recycle just about everything you need to cook a turkey dinner on the BBQ so cleanup is a breeze!  (Cue collective “Yes!” from mothers everywhere).

Move over Martha Stewart, this is Thanksgiving Canadian style!

Imagine how delicious a BBQ turkey would taste, seasoned with fresh herbs and hot off the grill; dotted with cranberry sauce, prepared gravy, fresh fall vegetables and a slice of pumpkin pie with whipped cream for dessert! Add a nice hot cup of coffee, maybe a S’more or two and you’re ready for a relaxing campfire under the stars.

Continue reading BBQ turkey for Thanksgiving? Why not? Roofed accommodations make Thanksgiving getaways a breeze

10 ways to enjoy fall at Ontario Parks

1.    Book a Prince Edward County adventure

Maple Rest Heritage House  is a four-bedroom Victorian farmhouse. Jacques Cottage  has a beautiful view of Lake Ontario. You can book either for a fall getaway to Prince Edward County this fall through Sandbanks Provincial Park.

 2.    Find a quiet corner of Algonquin

Check out these tips from staff on how to explore a less busy side of Algonquin in the fall.

Continue reading 10 ways to enjoy fall at Ontario Parks

New roofed accommodation at Ontario Parks

Five Ontario Parks are getting new roofed accommodation. The cabins at Finlayson Point, Fushimi Lake, Charleston Lake and Bon Echo Provincial Parks are available now for reservations.  Presqu’ile Provincial Parks’ retrofitted cabin will be available soon for booking.  The new accommodation will add to the existing variety of roofed accommodation in Ontario that includes new cabins earlier this year at Arrowhead Provincial Park as well as a Victorian farm house, two lodges, historic ranger cabins, lakeside cottages and deluxe yurts and cabins.

Cabin at Charleston Lake
Tall Pines Cabin at Charleston Lake

Continue reading New roofed accommodation at Ontario Parks

The Zen of sleeping indoors: student-built cabins offer bug-free “camping”

Tired of sleeping on the ground?  Tired of hauling all of your camping gear around?   Tired of swatting bugs all night long? 

 Although some purists may throw down their tents and solar powered espresso machines in defiance, a growing number of visitors to Ontario Parks actually prefer to sleep indoors and are asking for more roofed accommodations.

 Some visitors want the comforts of home like a bed, mattress, microwave, propane BBQ and best of all a bug-free, swat-free, covered porch with a view of the lake. Continue reading The Zen of sleeping indoors: student-built cabins offer bug-free “camping”

A Natural Fit

Connecting with nature has lots of benefits.

It keeps us healthy by lowering our blood pressure and strengthening our immune system. It reduces our stress levels and keeps us physically fit.

It’s good for our emotional wellbeing too. Children who play in natural environments are more resilient and develop skills for dealing with stress later in life.

Parks provide unparalleled natural classrooms and recreation opportunities for people of all ages.

And now there’s a new initiative – developed jointly by federal, provincial and territorial governments – that focuses on the importance nature plays in our lives. Ministers responsible for parks across the country recently met in Ontario to finalize the Connecting Canadians with Nature report, which was co-ordinated through the Canadian Parks Council.

The report builds on what Ontario Parks is already doing.

Last year Ontario Parks offered more than 1,000 nature programs for 37,000 children. In addition, provincial parks offered nature-based education programs for more than 800 school groups and 20,000 children.

And Mom and Dad aren’t left out. Ontario Parks provide adult education programs as well.

Ontario Parks offers Learn to Camp and Learn to Fish programs, which introduce city dwellers to these great outdoor activities and encourages them to become life-long park users.


Many parks offer recreational opportunities and facilities to meet the needs of mature park visitors and people with disabilities, such as yurts, cabins, accessible comfort stations, campsites and trails.

Also, Ontario and seven not-for-profit partners have launched the Ontario Children’s Outdoor Charter to help children across the province develop a life-long connection with nature.

So, visit a park and connect with nature!


Yurts And Mini Learning Vacations

If you’re thinking of booking a yurt this fall you can try one of Ontario Parks’ new learning vacations. Maybe you’ll get really adventurous and combine a yurt stay with a winter workshop. Yurts are surprisingly comfortable which is good news for boomers who used to camp, but in the last couple of years have chosen the creature comforts that nearby housekeeping resorts offer. Continue reading Yurts And Mini Learning Vacations