Sketching Superior: the Group of Seven in Neys Provincial Park

Today’s post is from Maureen Forrester, Neys Provincial Park’s Natural Heritage Education Leader.

The Group of Seven is a famous group of Canadian artists who formed with the mission to paint the truly rugged landscape of Canada; something they did not feel could be achieved with the popular European artistic style of the time.

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Listening to nature’s music

Today’s post comes from Kyra Santin, a Natural Heritage Education and Marketing Student from our Northwest Zone. George Santayana — poet, philosopher and naturalist — said, “The Earth has music for those who listen.”

The earth holds a lot of beauty within it. If we open our eyes and ears, and listen to the world that surrounds us, we can truly appreciate the music the earth is making.

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A canoe journey to each point of the compass

In today’s post, Conor Mihell captures the timelessness of Wabakimi Provincial Park.

The rumble of car tires on gravel slowly fading into the distance is the glorious sound of freedom after many long hours on the road. Silence descends, and suddenly my wife Kim and I are alone and faced with the task of loading 24 days worth of food and gear into our canoe and setting off on Little Caribou Lake, across the threshold of Wabakimi Provincial Park.

The isolation is at once daunting and exciting; there are few places where the feeling is more intense than in the hinterlands of northwestern Ontario.

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Exploring the Great Trail in northwestern Ontario Parks

Today’s post comes from Michelle Halstead, a travel, tourism and eco-adventure placement student with Ontario Parks Northwest Zone.

Canada is proud to be the home of the greatest recreational trail in the world. A 24,000 km trail of land and water that stretches across 10 provinces and three territories.

The Great Trail (formally known as the Trans Canada Trail or TCT) is a project that started in 1992 and with the help of various donors and volunteers working together across the nation has become one of the greatest trails in the world. The trail offers a variety of outdoor recreation activities and scenery throughout Canada’s urban, rural and wilderness areas.

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Top 3 paddling destinations in Ontario’s Sunset Country

Ever paddled through the hush of the boreal forest at dawn? Watched the sun rise over a network of Canadian Shield lakes?

Whether you prefer canoe, kayak or SUP, Sunset Country is a paddler’s paradise.

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The Canadian Heritage Rivers System’s Bloodvein River — a backcountry dream

This post was written by Northwestern Ontario Parks Planning Intern Kestrel Wraggett. 

We know that Ontario Parks protect some of the most unique and precious natural systems in the province, but did you know we help protect a nationally recognized network of significant waterways called the Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS).

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Ouimet Canyon: a northwestern birding hotspot

Today’s post comes from our Northwest Regional Planning Ecologist Bill Greaves.

Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park is typically visited for its jaw-dropping geological feature, but it’s also one of the better birding hotspots in the Thunder Bay area.

What might you see at Ouimet Canyon?

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Top 6 parks for canoe fishing in northern Ontario

Paddling into the wilderness, fishing from a canoe and then going back to camp to enjoy a backcountry fish fry is a special experience.

If you’re up for a trip like this, check out our recommendations for the best backcountry fishing destinations in our northern parks.  Continue reading Top 6 parks for canoe fishing in northern Ontario

The Boundary Waters/Voyageur Waterway: a Canadian Heritage River

Today’s post was written by Kestrel Wraggett, a planning intern from our Northwest Zone.

Did you know that there’s a network of nationally recognized significant waterways all over Canada?

There are 42 Canadian Heritage Rivers within the country, 12 of which are located in Ontario. Two of these designated heritage rivers run through Northwestern Ontario and both are located within the boundaries of provincial parks.

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Chilling out by the lake: arctic-alpine disjunct plants along Lake Superior

Today’s post comes from Park Naturalist Lesley Ng of Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Did you know there are blooming beauties which are adapted for the arctic tundra or alpine environments? In short, they like it cold!

And we don’t need traverse tundra or climb mountains to see them. We just need to take a spring hike along Lake Superior’s shoreline.

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