5 reasons to visit Rondeau this fall

You don’t need to leave southern Ontario to have a great fall experience. Rondeau Provincial Park — an oasis of nature nestled in between Windsor and London — has given visitors just that for over 125 years.

Ontario’s second oldest provincial park has it all: spectacular colours, vibrant wildlife, and activities for the whole family.

Here are five reasons why Rondeau Provincial Park is a must-see spot this fall:

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Bon Echo’s Wanderer Tour

Today’s blog comes from Caitie Carney,  a member of Bon Echo’s Discovery Program team.

If you asked visitors at Bon Echo Provincial Park “What keeps you coming back?”, the answer you’d probably hear is “Mazinaw Rock.”

Standing 92 m (300 feet) above Mazinaw Lake, Mazinaw Rock is a spectacle that commands the attention of visitors both on land and on water.

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Stars over Killarney 2019: a celebration of Indigenous astronomy

Did you know that 2019 is the United Nations year of Indigenous Languages?

In celebration, Killarney Provincial Park and our Wiikwemkoong partners at Point Grondine Park, along with our colleagues at Science North, are thrilled to present Stars over Killarney 2019: a weekend of Indigenous astronomy and cultural learning!

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Stories in the stars / Pride in our hearts

Today’s post comes from Will Morin, a Professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Sudbury and Bruce Waters, a former educator at the McLaughlin Planetarium and founder of the Killarney Provincial Park Observatory.

It’s time we learn the astronomical traditions of the diverse Indigenous cultures in the Americas.

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A brief introduction to Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

Anishinaabemowin has and always will play a major role in my life.

I have been fortunate to have the circumstances to pursue my traditional language to the extent that I have. Some people describe me as fluent, but I try to avoid such a label. I will always have more to learn, and frankly I can still have a hard time following along when listening to first language speakers.

In any case — at 28 — I am among a very small number of young Anishinaabe people who have the ability to converse in our traditional language.

But there are many thousands of people who are seeking to learn.

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Greetings, Boozhoo, Aaniin, Sekoh, Wachay, Ullakut!

National Indigenous Peoples Day invites us to learn more about Indigenous history, perspectives and culture, and helps us build stronger relationships rooted in mutual respect and understanding.

We’re taking the opportunity to spotlight some of the wonderful partnerships and events shared with us by Indigenous leaders and communities across Ontario:

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Speaking Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

As a person of mixed ancestry, pursuing the expression of my identity has been an unending journey.

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The pronunciation and writing systems of Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

To read the language, it is necessary to be aware of the writing systems used for Anishinaabemowin.

Various folk-writings have and continue to be used but the most widely used system of writing is the “Fiero” double-vowel system that is intended to be consistent and phonetic.

Below is a rough breakdown of the system.

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“Gathering” at Rondeau

Today’s post comes from Jess Matthews, a Natural Heritage Education Specialist at Rondeau Provincial Park.

About a year ago, we looked at a well-loved, yet aging display in the Rondeau Visitor Centre.

Hundreds of visitors learned from it over the years, but it was becoming faded and worn — it was time for a change.

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