Healing in the forest: a guide to forest bathing

Let’s take a walk in the woods.

With no specific destination in mind, we will wander, observe and immerse ourselves in nature. Allow our senses to guide us.

When was the last time you walked into the woods with no plans? No final destination? Without a species to ID, hill to climb, or lookout to conquer?

This is exactly the experience offered by a forest bathing session.

Continue reading Healing in the forest: a guide to forest bathing

Take the 30×30 Challenge!

During August, we challenge you to spend 30 minutes in nature for 30 days!

Tackle the Ontario Parks 30×30 Challenge!

Head outside to a green space and spend 30 minutes reconnecting with nature and improving your health. Nature can be as close as the park down the street or found in one of Ontario’s more than 300 provincial parks.

Register here for the 30×30 Challenge!

Continue reading Take the 30×30 Challenge!

Is your favourite park making you sneeze?

For those who suffer from asthma or allergies, the warmer weather and park visits can sometimes mean running nose, watery eyes or breathing difficulties.

It’s time for a quick pollen lesson to better equip you to take control of your breathing.

Continue reading Is your favourite park making you sneeze?

A Natural Fit

Connecting with nature has lots of benefits.

It keeps us healthy by lowering our blood pressure and strengthening our immune system. It reduces our stress levels and keeps us physically fit.

It’s good for our emotional wellbeing too. Children who play in natural environments are more resilient and develop skills for dealing with stress later in life.

Parks provide unparalleled natural classrooms and recreation opportunities for people of all ages.

And now there’s a new initiative – developed jointly by federal, provincial and territorial governments – that focuses on the importance nature plays in our lives. Ministers responsible for parks across the country recently met in Ontario to finalize the Connecting Canadians with Nature report, which was co-ordinated through the Canadian Parks Council.

The report builds on what Ontario Parks is already doing.

Last year Ontario Parks offered more than 1,000 nature programs for 37,000 children. In addition, provincial parks offered nature-based education programs for more than 800 school groups and 20,000 children.

And Mom and Dad aren’t left out. Ontario Parks provide adult education programs as well.

Ontario Parks offers Learn to Camp and Learn to Fish programs, which introduce city dwellers to these great outdoor activities and encourages them to become life-long park users.

 

Many parks offer recreational opportunities and facilities to meet the needs of mature park visitors and people with disabilities, such as yurts, cabins, accessible comfort stations, campsites and trails.

Also, Ontario and seven not-for-profit partners have launched the Ontario Children’s Outdoor Charter to help children across the province develop a life-long connection with nature.

So, visit a park and connect with nature!

 

Here’s to your HEALTH!

21777Algonquin
Have you ever considered the extent to which parks can play a role in your health? People place a high value on parks (and other protected areas) for good reason, they help protect Ontario’s vast diversity of plants, animals and their habitat, as well as the environment. But more and more, parks around the world are being recognized as landscapes that deeply touch our collective spirit. Continue reading Here’s to your HEALTH!