Can we bring painted rocks to the park?

Art and nature go together like columbine flowers and hummingbird tongues.

Indigenous artists express their relationship to land through art; Canada’s Group of Seven found inspiration in several Ontario Parks; parks offer residency programs, and our park visitors find many artistic ways to capture their memories. We love it when visitors share their artistic creations with us.

However, a new trend is starting to cause problems province-wide: the painted rock.

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An Ontario Parks glossary

Are you new to camping, or maybe a park veteran looking to brush up on your knowledge?

We’ve assembled a handy guide to all the terms you’ll need to know and understand before you visit the park…

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Driftwood: shaping shorelines and completing communities

For a while, park staff have been wondering: why do some of our guests who come to visit natural environments feel compelled to leave their mark on that beach, waterfall, or lookout after they’ve left?

At MacGregor Point Provincial Park, we’ve noticed some changes being made to our shorelines by well-meaning sun-seekers who visit our beach for a short time, but leave behind structures made of driftwood.

Staff in our park and others have disassembled several driftwood forts upon discovering them on our beaches, which can be a dangerous task.

Let’s talk about why we’d prefer our visitors to leave driftwood where it lies, and some fun things you can do at the beach instead of building forts.

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Keeping dogs on-leash protects our parks’ ecological integrity

Today’s blog comes from Emma Dennis, an assistant Discovery Program leader at Killarney Provincial Park.

I am a lover of the outdoors and an avid hiker, so it’s only natural that I own two dogs that share that same passions. As Killarney residents, we are lucky enough to have Killarney Provincial Park as our backyard.

Whether we are hitting the Granite Ridge Trail on a Sunday morning for a quick hike to start our day, or spending the afternoon adventuring to the top of “The Crack,” we live our best lives when we are hiking the trails.

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How to build a bat box

Today’s post comes from Rachelle Law, a Discovery leader at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

Are you looking for a fun do-it-yourself project to do this summer?

Would you love a solution to the amount of pesky mosquitoes in your backyard?

Are you passionate about creating habitats for wildlife?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, this blog is for you!

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All buzz, little to no bite

Today’s post comes from Jared Sanders, with information provided by Erin Postenka. They are both members of the Resource Management Team at Pinery Provincial Park.

In my youth, the sight of any yellow and black flying insect was terrifying to me.

Any child who has been stung quickly learns that bees and wasps are not to be messed with!

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How to leave the park greener than you found it

Today’s post comes from Sheila Wiebe, a marketing and development specialist at Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

I promise to be greener.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m already pretty green. However, after leading an Earth Day park clean up, I decided I need to take it one step further and double up my efforts to further reduce my impact on the environment.

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Help us protect Lion’s Head Provincial Park’s sensitive species and ecosystems

Lion’s Head Provincial Park needs our help! This summer, the park has experienced high use, which is putting stress on this amazing habitat.

What you may not know is that Lion’s Head Provincial Park is open for day use only, and has limited parking and no facilities or camping.

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Empty propane cylinder? Orange Drop to the rescue!

Packing up your picnic or campsite?

Please be sure your leftover propane cylinders don’t go into the garbage or recycling!

These cylinders contain pressurized gas and chemicals, so safe and proper disposal is crucial to make sure nothing harmful leaks into Ontario’s groundwater and waterways.

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On fire

Some of the technology to fight forest fires was first developed almost a century ago. The province has used this technology for many decades to prevent and extinguish wildfires in Ontario Parks and other protected areas.

Over time, we discovered something interesting. Aggressively extinguishing fires didn’t stop forest fires. It only postponed them.

We needed a strategy that protects people and property, but keeps forests strong and healthy too.

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