Neys’ relics from the past

Today’s post comes from Katherine Muzyliwsky, a Natural Heritage Education Student at Neys Provincial Park.

Before Neys became a provincial park, it was known as Neys Camp 100. Instead of happy campers on vacation, the park held German prisoners of war during World War II.

After operating as a prisoner of war camp from 1941-1946, the buildings were dismantled in 1953. Since then, artifacts have showed up from discoveries in the park and from generous donations.

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From prisoner of war camp to provincial park

Today’s post comes from Laura Myers, a Marketing Specialist with Ontario Parks.

Approximately 70 years ago, Neys Provincial Park’s campground looked very different than it does today.

During World War II, the area now known as Neys Provincial Park was referred to as Neys Camp 100.

Instead of campers, it mainly held high-ranking German prisoners of war (POW). The camp operated from 1941 to 1946.

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400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain’s exploration of Ontario

Many of us learned about Samuel de Champlain — French explorer and founder of New France back in the 1600s — in history class. Many of us have forgotten what we learned about him, and some of us have never heard of him. This year, 2015, marks the 400th anniversary of the exploration of Ontario by Samuel de Champlain, so it seems like a good time to take another look.
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