Why kayaks are an awesome way to fish Ontario Parks

In today’s post, Scott Gardner, Associate Editor of  Outdoor Canada, shares his love for and experience with kayak fishing. All photos below are copyright to Scott Gardner.

On a cloudless summer afternoon, I paddled around a point on Six Mile Lake, eased my boat through a jumble of boulders, and slipped into a long shallow bay. No more than 18 inches deep and blanketed in lily pads, it was perfect largemouth bass habitat.

Even better, the propeller-killing rock barrier made it unlikely that any serious fishing boats ever tried this spot. As my kayak ghosted silently to the edge of the weeds, I cast my lure deep into the lily field. I twitched it twice across the surface, and with a heart-stopping splash, it was ambushed by a football-sized largemouth bass.

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SUP tripping in Killarney

Today’s post comes from keen paddler and photographer Grant Sutherland.

Any excuse to get back to Killarney Provincial Park is a good excuse. So when my wife Heather and I took an interest in stand-up paddleboarding, we thought it was a perfect opportunity to try something new.

Backcountry tripping with paddleboards? Sounds like a great adventure!

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5 life-changing paddling routes of Northeastern Ontario

Whether you’re planning a scenic day trip or a rugged backcountry adventure, Northeastern Ontario is a paddler’s playground.

Last year, Northeastern Ontario Tourism asked their readers to vote for their top paddling destinations…

…and the votes are in!

Join us in counting down the top 5 paddling destinations of Northeastern Ontario:

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2016 Frontenac Challenge wrap-up

Today’s post comes from Content Development Specialist Evan Holt. This is Evan’s fourth year completing the Frontenac Challenge!

Frontenac Provincial Park offers a unique challenge to autumn visitors that isn’t found elsewhere in the province. About half-way through my first attempt at hiking the complete 160 km of the challenge I found myself falling in love with the park.

Here’s a quick look at a growing destination for hikers, campers, canoeists and trail runners.

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Wooden canoe- and paddle-making in Ontario

Wooden canoes and paddles are closely linked to Ontarians’ collective sense of history. For centuries, rivers and lakes were the railways of their time: traversing our waterways by canoe was how Indigenous people and early European settlers explored this vast country.

Ontario is known as the “canoe capital” of the world for good reason. Our endless lake and river routes run from the far north of the province to the U.S. border.

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Welcome to Grey Owl country

Archie Belaney — the man many know as “Grey Owl” — dreamed of living in the wilds of Canada. Here’s how the now-famous author, public speaker and early Canadian environmentalist described the North Country:

It is a land of shadows and hidden trails, lost rivers and unknown lakes, a region of soft-footed creatures going their noiseless ways over the carpet of moss, and there is silence, intense, absolute and all-embracing.”

The following film retraces conservationist Grey Owl’s path through the northeastern Ontario’s legendary Temagami region – n’Daki Menan Aboriginal community.

Experience the old growth forest and beauty that captured Grey Owl’s heart:

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Are you ready for the Missinaibi River?

Backcountry-lover Scott Elliott, a Partnership Development Specialist from our main office, shares the story of his nine-day wilderness adventure.

Many parks are easily accessible; you just pack your tent and sleeping bag, hop in the car and roll into your weekend campground.

But some parks require planning, motivation, and a refined skill-set.

Missinaibi Provincial Park is one of those parks.

Continue reading Are you ready for the Missinaibi River?