Killarney’s 15th Annual Butterfly Count: What’s Happening with Killarney’s Butterflies?

On July 7, Killarney Provincial Park celebrated the 15th Annual Butterfly Count completing a decade and a half long snapshot of its butterflies.  The event provides volunteers with an opportunity to learn about and make a connection with our spectacular butterflies. Continue reading Killarney’s 15th Annual Butterfly Count: What’s Happening with Killarney’s Butterflies?

Still howling after 50 years!

In the summer of 1963, park naturalists in Algonquin Provincial Park came up with the idea for a new interpretive program: an evening of “wolf listening.” On August 15, 656 people in 164 cars showed up much to the shock and delight of park staff! As is often said, the rest is history. Since that very first Public Wolf Howl 50 years ago, approximately 160,000 visitors -an average of about 1,800 per event- have taken part in what is now listed as a Canadian Tourism Commission Signature Experience. Continue reading Still howling after 50 years!

Species at risk: researching eastern whip-poor-wills in Algonquin Provincial Park

Have you ever heard the call of a whip-poor-will? Unlike many other birds, its call is very distinctive. The eastern whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) is a “name-sayer” and certainly a vociferous one, with records of calls repeated over 1000 times!

Continue reading Species at risk: researching eastern whip-poor-wills in Algonquin Provincial Park

Dramatic Changes at Killbear Provincial Park

Harold Point campground
Harold Point campground

In the fall of 2012, Killbear Provincial Park began cutting down thousands of American beech trees infected with beech bark disease.  These trees were in danger of falling on campsites, park roads and trails.  Beech bark disease can weaken tree trunks and cause them to snap unexpectedly. Continue reading Dramatic Changes at Killbear Provincial Park

Tracking mysteries at Ontario Parks

On winter mornings especially after a light dusting of snow, animal tracks deposited under the cover of darkness provide clues about wildlife inhabiting Ontario Parks – tracks left in snow, chewed bark on or around a tree, snapped twigs, traces of urine, blood, or feathers or even evidence of a life and death struggle. Continue reading Tracking mysteries at Ontario Parks