Ticks and itches lead to moose hair loss

The iconic Canadian moose is the largest mammal to roam in Algonquin Provincial Park and thousands of park visitors delight in spotting them every year. 

Yet did you know these majestic animals are sometimes under attack by a blood-sucking parasite the size of a grain of quinoa?  Multiply these voracious vampires by the thousands on a single moose and you have relentless grooming that causes some moose to lose their hair and increase their risk of dying from hypothermia. 

So what causes this maddening and potentially lethal infestation? Continue reading Ticks and itches lead to moose hair loss

Burnt Lands Buckthorn Removal Blitz!

Guest Blogger: Erica Barkley
Assistant Zone Ecologist
Southeast Zone
 Ontario Parks is home to amazing natural places, and it’s our job to look after them. At Burnt Lands Provincial Park, a non-operating Nature Reserve near Almonte, park staff and partners came together to do just that.
Before and after European buckthorn removal at Burnt Lands Provincial Park.

Continue reading Burnt Lands Buckthorn Removal Blitz!

Species at risk: researching eastern whip-poor-wills in Algonquin Provincial Park

Have you ever heard the call of a whip-poor-will? Unlike many other birds, its call is very distinctive. The eastern whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus) is a “name-sayer” and certainly a vociferous one, with records of calls repeated over 1000 times!

Continue reading Species at risk: researching eastern whip-poor-wills in Algonquin Provincial Park

Dramatic Changes at Killbear Provincial Park

Harold Point campground
Harold Point campground

In the fall of 2012, Killbear Provincial Park began cutting down thousands of American beech trees infected with beech bark disease.  These trees were in danger of falling on campsites, park roads and trails.  Beech bark disease can weaken tree trunks and cause them to snap unexpectedly. Continue reading Dramatic Changes at Killbear Provincial Park

Springwater

As part of the Ministry of Natural Resources’ September 2012 transformation announcement, Ontario Parks will change the designation of a number of provincial parks, including Springwater Provincial Park, from operating to non-operating.  In deciding which parks to re-designate, we looked at many factors including low visitation rates, low cost recovery, and the upcoming need for investment in capital upgrades to remain operational. Continue reading Springwater