Sketching Superior: the Group of Seven in Neys Provincial Park

Today’s post is from Maureen Forrester, Neys Provincial Park’s Natural Heritage Education Leader.

The Group of Seven is a famous group of Canadian artists who formed with the mission to paint the truly rugged landscape of Canada; something they did not feel could be achieved with the popular European artistic style of the time.

Continue reading Sketching Superior: the Group of Seven in Neys Provincial Park

How Pancake Bay got its name

Today’s post comes from — you guessed it — Pancake Bay Provincial Park.

Where did the name Pancake Bay come from? The answer changes depending on who you ask.

Ask a local and they’ll tell you one story. Ask a Pancake Bay staff member and they’ll tell you another. Ask a child and they will tell you it’s because the beach is flat like a pancake 😉

But no matter whom you ask, the name is closely tied to the voyageurs.

Continue reading How Pancake Bay got its name

Trailblazers of Ontario Parks interpretation

Last year marked Ontario Parks’ 125th anniversary: 125 years of campfires, hikes, nights under the stars, days at the beach, and unforgettable family memories of the countless visitors who use our beautiful park system.

This year marks two other important anniversaries – Rondeau Provincial Park’s 125th anniversary and 75 years of interpretation in Ontario Parks!

Continue reading Trailblazers of Ontario Parks interpretation

Then and now: Marten River

So who’s this guy “Marten” anyway?

Often called the southern gateway to Temagami, Marten River Provincial Park straddles the Marten River, which is part of an ancient network of waterways that stitch the landscape together.

And Marten River isn’t named for a fellow named Martin…its named for the Pine Marten (also called American Marten).

Continue reading Then and now: Marten River

A brief introduction to Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

Anishinaabemowin has and always will play a major role in my life.

I have been fortunate to have the circumstances to pursue my traditional language to the extent that I have. Some people describe me as fluent, but I try to avoid such a label. I will always have more to learn, and frankly I can still have a hard time following along when listening to first language speakers.

In any case — at 28 — I am among a very small number of young Anishinaabe people who have the ability to converse in our traditional language.

But there are many thousands of people who are seeking to learn.

Continue reading A brief introduction to Anishinaabemowin

Speaking Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

As a person of mixed ancestry, pursuing the expression of my identity has been an unending journey.

Continue reading Speaking Anishinaabemowin

The pronunciation and writing systems of Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

To read the language, it is necessary to be aware of the writing systems used for Anishinaabemowin.

Various folk-writings have and continue to be used but the most widely used system of writing is the “Fiero” double-vowel system that is intended to be consistent and phonetic.

Below is a rough breakdown of the system.

Continue reading The pronunciation and writing systems of Anishinaabemowin

The surprising, shocking, startling, astonishing story of Silver Islet

Today’s post comes from Will Oades, Natural Heritage Educator at Sleeping Giant Provincial Park. Header photo: Jeff Robinson.

Have you ever applied for a job, shown up on the first day of work, and realized it was nothing like you thought it would be? That was the case among many of the men coming to work at the Silver Islet Mine.

Known as the world’s richest silver mine, Silver Islet’s mine shaft was beneath the icy waters of Lake Superior; a small yet significant piece of information that was missed by some of the miners before arriving. Though the majority of the miners stayed to do the job that they were hired for, some of them decided that travelling into the belly of the earth, underneath billions of litres of water was just a little too dangerous for their liking.

Continue reading The surprising, shocking, startling, astonishing story of Silver Islet

Paddle like it’s 1796 at Samuel de Champlain Provincial Park!

Experience the life of a voyageur at the height of the fur trade by paddling a voyageur canoe on the beautiful Mattawa River.

Our knowledgeable guides will help you discover part of our Canadian heritage.

Continue reading Paddle like it’s 1796 at Samuel de Champlain Provincial Park!