Summer bioblitzes at Algonquin

In honour of our 125th anniversary, our oldest provincial park, Algonquin, is hosting a bioblitz series!

Join park naturalists for weekly programs where you will learn how to identify and inventory different species, as well as the importance of citizen science in protecting the biodiversity of our parks.

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Then and now: vintage parks postcards

2018 marks Ontario Parks’ 125th anniversary and we’ve been digging through our archives in search of some of the coolest vintage photographs, documents, and artifacts. Throughout the year we are sharing our discoveries in a series of OP125 blog posts!

This post showcases a collection of vintage postcards featuring a few of our beautiful parks in northwestern Ontario!

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From prisoner of war camp to provincial park

Today’s post comes from Laura Myers, a Marketing Specialist with Ontario Parks.

Approximately 70 years ago, Neys Provincial Park’s campground looked very different than it does today.

During World War II, the area now known as Neys Provincial Park was referred to as Neys Camp 100.

Instead of campers, it mainly held high-ranking German prisoners of war (POW). The camp operated from 1941 to 1946.

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50 years at Sandbanks

This week’s post comes from father and grandfather Roger Duffy, whose family has camped at Sandbanks Provincial Park every year since 1968!

My how time flies.

July of 1968 was our first camping trip to Sandbanks Provincial Park (then known as Outlet Beach Provincial Park).

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The makings and teachings of the birchbark canoe

Chuck Commanda grew up part of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, an Algonquin First Nation. As a young boy, he helped his grandparents make birchbark canoes. Now, years later, Chuck enjoys sharing his knowledge and showcasing his skills to the public.

Chuck recently attended the “Politics of the Canoe” workshop in Winnipeg, where he says much of the discussion focused on reconciliation through the canoe.

“The canoe is a shared experience that all Indigenous and non-Indigenous people can relate to. That makes it an effective tool for reconciliation.”

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Paddle like it’s 1796 at Samuel de Champlain Provincial Park!

Experience the life of a voyageur at the height of the fur trade by paddling a voyageur canoe on the beautiful Mattawa River.

Our knowledgeable guides will help you discover part of our Canadian heritage.

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