The Ontario Parks Discovery Program: 75 years in the making

In 1944, Algonquin Provincial Park decided to try something new.

They hired Professor J.R. Dymond, Director of the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology, to deliver guided hikes for park visitors. Those first interpretive programs were a success and what would become the Ontario Parks Discovery Program was born.

Seventy-five years later, roughly 300 Discovery staff in over 70 parks continue to engage visitors with stories of Ontario’s natural and cultural heritage and encourage them to explore further.

Continue reading The Ontario Parks Discovery Program: 75 years in the making

Pinery goes to battle for bats

Today’s post comes from Natural Heritage Education Supervisor Alistair MacKenzie and Bat Stewardship Technician Heather Sanders.

Did you know Pinery Provincial Park has been a bat research hot spot for more than four decades? We’ve collaborated with research groups at York University, Western University and the University of Waterloo.

Much of what we know about Ontario bats — including their migration, diet, and behaviour — is all thanks to work done at Pinery.

Continue reading Pinery goes to battle for bats

7 reasons your family will fall in love with Bonnechere Provincial Park!

Looking for a new park to explore with your family? How about a park that offers great swimming, paddling, and hiking and will have your kids picking books from a tree?

Bonnechere Provincial Park — located in Killaloe, ON (just 2 hours from Ottawa) — is one of the Ottawa Valley’s hidden gems.

Here are some of the reasons your family will love this park:

Continue reading 7 reasons your family will fall in love with Bonnechere Provincial Park!

From prisoner of war camp to provincial park

Today’s post comes from Laura Myers, a Marketing Specialist with Ontario Parks.

Approximately 70 years ago, Neys Provincial Park’s campground looked very different than it does today.

During World War II, the area now known as Neys Provincial Park was referred to as Neys Camp 100.

Instead of campers, it mainly held high-ranking German prisoners of war (POW). The camp operated from 1941 to 1946.

Continue reading From prisoner of war camp to provincial park

Introducing the Nature Playbook

This week, the Canadian Parks Council unveiled an exciting new project: the Nature Playbook!

Just as the plays in a coach’s playbook spark movement and bring the team together, the Nature Playbook is designed to inspire action — bringing Canadians into the nature game!

Continue reading Introducing the Nature Playbook