A brief introduction to Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

Anishinaabemowin has and always will play a major role in my life.

I have been fortunate to have the circumstances to pursue my traditional language to the extent that I have. Some people describe me as fluent, but I try to avoid such a label. I will always have more to learn, and frankly I can still have a hard time following along when listening to first language speakers.

In any case — at 28 — I am among a very small number of young Anishinaabe people who have the ability to converse in our traditional language.

But there are many thousands of people who are seeking to learn.

Continue reading A brief introduction to Anishinaabemowin

Greetings, Boozhoo, Aaniin, Sekoh, Wachay, Ullakut!

National Indigenous Peoples Day invites us to learn more about Indigenous history, perspectives and culture, and helps us build stronger relationships rooted in mutual respect and understanding.

We’re taking the opportunity to spotlight some of the wonderful partnerships and events shared with us by Indigenous leaders and communities across Ontario:

Continue reading Greetings, Boozhoo, Aaniin, Sekoh, Wachay, Ullakut!

Speaking Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

As a person of mixed ancestry, pursuing the expression of my identity has been an unending journey.

Continue reading Speaking Anishinaabemowin

The pronunciation and writing systems of Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from DJ Fife, a park warden at Petroglyphs Provincial ParkDJ takes every opportunity available to promote the preservation of Anishinaabemowin during programs at the park and in everyday life. DJ has taught Anishnaabemowin for several semesters at Georgian College in Barrie and during several other cultural events.

To read the language, it is necessary to be aware of the writing systems used for Anishinaabemowin.

Various folk-writings have and continue to be used but the most widely used system of writing is the “Fiero” double-vowel system that is intended to be consistent and phonetic.

Below is a rough breakdown of the system.

Continue reading The pronunciation and writing systems of Anishinaabemowin

Campsite vacancy highlights: June 21-23

Celebrate the summer solstice surrounded by nature.

We’ve got plenty of waterfront campsites available for the weekend, and a few cabins too!

Scout out your ideal campsite on our Campsite Browsing/Reservation tool (including pictures of most campsites!), or check out these featured campsites (available as of 10:00 am on June 20, 2019):

Continue reading Campsite vacancy highlights: June 21-23

For the love of camping

The crackle of the campfire. The ripple of the wind across the lake. The call of a loon at dusk. The soft cushion of pine needles beneath your boots.

For many of us, camping sings in our heartstrings. The sounds, sights, smells of our favourite parks are a balm for our tired minds.

We wish everyone could know the deep satisfaction found in the soft resistance of water against a paddle, or the smokey perfection of a fire-cooked meal.

But sadly, not everyone does.

Yet.

Continue reading For the love of camping

The Ontario Parks Discovery Program: 75 years in the making

In 1944, Algonquin Provincial Park decided to try something new.

They hired Professor J.R. Dymond, Director of the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology, to deliver guided hikes for park visitors. Those first interpretive programs were a success and what would become the Ontario Parks Discovery Program was born.

Seventy-five years later, roughly 300 Discovery staff in over 70 parks continue to engage visitors with stories of Ontario’s natural and cultural heritage and encourage them to explore further.

Continue reading The Ontario Parks Discovery Program: 75 years in the making

Backcountry canoeing with your dog

Today’s post comes from Jill Legault, Information Specialist at Quetico Provincial Park

Summertime means puppy playtime!

Dogs love the opportunity to be outside as much as you do. A little planning means every family member is happy and safe in the backcountry.

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Where to camp when your fave park is already full

Did you know over 50% of reservations made by the end of March are for our five most popular parks (Bon Echo, Algonquin, Sandbanks, Killbear, Pinery)?

If you can’t get a campsite at one of these parks, we’ve got some suggestions we’re sure you’ll love…

Continue reading Where to camp when your fave park is already full