Restoule

Biking

Gibs Trail and Angels Point Trails are bicycle friendly and the many kilometers of road in the park make this an excellent way to get from point to point.

Birding

More than 90 species of birds frequent the waters and forests of Restoule including, Peregrine Falcons, Bald Eagle and Osprey.

Boating

There are many secluded kilometers of lakes and river to explore by boat, canoe and kayak. Well marked campsites and portages provide easy access to Restoule, Stormy and Clear Lake and the Restoule River. Boat launches and docks are located on Restoule and Stormy Lakes for day and overnight docking.

Canoeing

There are many secluded kilometers of lakes and river to explore by boat, canoe and kayak. Well marked campsites and portages provide easy access to Restoule, Stormy and Clear Lakes and the Restoule River.

Fishing

Lake Trout, Splake, Walleye, Pike, Muskie, Large and Smallmouth Bass and Lake Whitefish are commonly caught on the front and backcountry lakes in and around the park.

Hiking

Fire Tower Trail - 7 km
This loop trail will take from 2 to 2.5 hours and is rated as moderate with several steep rocky climbs.

The fire Tower Trail ascends through mixed forest cover and provides the opportunity to experience several stages of natural history including forest fire and severe wind events. The reward for your hard work is a spectacular view from atop the 100 meter tall Stormy Lake Bluffs and a close inspection of a historic fire tower.

The River Trail - 2 km
This loop trail is rated as easy as it takes you through the rolling topography of the west side of the Restoule River. This gently paced trail will take you about 45 minutes to complete.

Rangers Point Trail – 1 km
This easy loop trail provides walk-in access to two spectacular campsites in the backcountry. Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy the serenity of a waterfront campsite on Stormy Lake.

Angels Point – 5 km
There are two loops to this hiking and cycling trail, both are appropriate to every level of experience from “just out of training wheels” and beyond. Rated as easy, you can complete both loops in less than 60 minutes or spend a while longer to explore this rolling terrain.

Gibs Trail – This moderate to difficult linear trail is as long as you choose to make it. Gibs Trail is a beautiful undeveloped backcounty trail that leads out of the park into adjacent Crown lands. This trail is generally unmarked and unmaintained but remains obvious as it progresses generally westward toward the French River. Bicycles are permitted on Gibs Trail. Sections of this trail remain wet all season and several beaver dam crossings can add to the difficulty.

Once outside of the park, Gibs Trail has several branches and dead ends. A GPS and accurate map are recommended if you plan to leave the park boundaries.

Hunting

Time and location restrictions exist. Please contact the park directly for details and seasonal variations.

Natural Heritage Education

Educational, entertaining programs are offered 4-6 times a week from July to September.

Swimming

Three sandy beaches on Restoule Lake provide a relaxing place to soak up the sun. The Bells Point Beach is also pet friendly.