Le castor, architecte de la biodiversité

Today’s post was written by Dave Sproule, a specialist in natural heritage education programs. 

We all know that the beaver is industrious. We build dams, canals and solid shelters called huts, which are warm in winter. He repairs all these dams and accumulates enough food to survive the long northern winters.

We know that the Canadian environment is well suited to the beaver. It is amphibious – more at home in the water than on land – with its webbed hind feet, its closable nostrils, a third, transparent eyelid, which protects the eye when it is underwater, and a large flat tail used as a rudder when swimming.

However, the main reason to celebrate the beaver on this 50th anniversary is that it built Canada, and shaped its landscape, both historic and ecological.

Continue reading Le castor, architecte de la biodiversité

Le mésangeai du Canada, le véritable oiseau hâtif

L’expression anglaise « the early bird gets the worm » (l’avenir appartient à ceux qui se lèvent tôt, ou, dans notre cas, qui sont là tôt dans la saison) fait généralement penser au merle. Mais le véritable oiseau hâtif n’est pas le Merle d’Amérique avec sa poitrine rouge. C’est le Mésangeai du Canada.

Continue reading Le mésangeai du Canada, le véritable oiseau hâtif